Monday, July 21, 2014

Albany removes ‘no left turn’ sign on Washington Avenue eastbound onto Dove Street

From Times Union "Getting There" blog:

Q... I park in a lot on Elk Street between Dove and Lark streets. There is a “no left turn” sign for cars travelling east on Washington [at Dove] and trying to get to Elk... That means that any employees or patrons of the library, Armory or any other establishment on that block have to go to Swan Street to make the left to get to Elk... Between 4 and 6 p.m., there is no left on Swan and we have to go another block [to Hawk]. This makes no sense.

— Marty Richmond, Fultonville

A: As a result of your question, the city removed the sign this past Wednesday, said Steve Smith, Albany’s spokesman on traffic issues.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Albany Public Library is looking for Albany school yearbooks



The Main Library at Albany Public Library is now accepting donations of yearbooks from the current and former schools in the city of Albany. Yearbooks should be in good condition, but can have signatures and messages written in them. Yearbook donations can be dropped off during normal library hours at the first floor circulation desk, the basement reception desk, or the reference desk of the Main Library at 161 Washington Avenue.

APL's collection of Albany yearbooks is housed within the Pruyn Collection of Albany History, which is located in the Albany History Room on the second floor of the Main Library.

A recently donated 1932 Albany High School yearbook has been digitized by APL and can be viewed for free through New York Heritage Digital Collections, an online portal designed for researchers and history buffs. You can view APL's digital collection, including the 1932 yearbook, at nyheritage.org.

For more information about donating, or viewing, Albany yearbooks, please call the Reference Department at 427-4303 or email localhistory@albanypubliclibrary.org.

NewsChannel 13 did a brief story about APL's yearbook project, which you can view online.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Frank Robinson reviews The Age of Atheists by Peter Watson July 22

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

July 22— Book Review— The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God by Peter Watson. Reviewer: Frank Robinson, JD, retired NYS administrative law judge, author, and self-described rational optimist.

July 29—Book Review—Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math by Daniel Tammet. Reviewer: Roger Green, librarian & member of the board of the Friends of APL.



August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Bill Shapiro reviews Simpler: the Future of Government by Cass Sunstein July 15

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

July 15— Book Review—Simpler: the Future of Government by Cass Sunstein. Reviewer: Bill Shapiro, attorney and lifelong student of international relations.

July 22— Book Review— The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God by Peter Watson. Reviewer: Frank Robinson, JD, retired NYS administrative law judge, author, and self-described rational optimist.

July 29—Book Review—Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math by Daniel Tammet. Reviewer: Roger Green, librarian & member of the board of the Friends of APL.



August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Saturday, July 05, 2014

David Colchamiro reviews The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 by Margaret MacMillan July 8

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

July 8—Book Review—The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 by Margaret MacMillan. Reviewer: David Colchamiro, retired transportation analyst & member of the board of the Friends of APL.

July 15— Book Review—Simpler: the Future of Government by Cass Sunstein. Reviewer: Bill Shapiro, attorney and lifelong student of international relations.

July 22— Book Review— The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God by Peter Watson. Reviewer: Frank Robinson, JD, retired NYS administrative law judge, author, and self-described rational optimist.

July 29—Book Review—Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math by Daniel Tammet. Reviewer: Roger Green, librarian & member of the board of the Friends of APL.



August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

New Youth Library Card at the Albany Public Library

MyCARD Makes it Easier for Albany Kids and Teens to Access APL on Own

APL is making it easier for Albany youngsters to use the library with the new MyCARD. This library card allows Albany children to get a library card on their own and use it to borrow up to three items at a time, with no late fees. MyCARD also gives users access to the library's free public computers and to digital materials, like eBooks and eMagazines, which are available for free from the library's website.  
 
MyCARD is only available to city of Albany youth under the age of 18, and can only be used at APL's seven locations in the city of Albany. As part of the MyCARD rollout, which begins on June 27, Albany Public Library is waiving late fees on all current children's cards. This one-time waiver will put current children's cardholders on the same level playing field as new MyCARD cardholders.


"The benefit of MyCARD is that youngsters can come into the library on their own and get a card that lets them borrow up to three items at a time, and have the freedom to take as long as they need to read those books without racking up late fees," Assistant Director Melanie Metzger said. "Once done with a book, a MyCARD user can return it to the library and borrow another one. This new card gives children and teens an opportunity to explore the library, and the world of reading, on their own."

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

All Acronyms dictionary

I take requests.

"I thought you might be interested in writing about one useful resource.

"All Acronyms ( http://www.allacronyms.com) is a user-friendly dictionary for acronyms and abbreviations with a large number of terms included.

"Hope this helps!"