Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Albany Seeking Applicants to Citizens' Police Review Board

City of Albany
Common Council

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Citizens’ Police Review Board

The Albany Common Council is seeking nominations of qualified residents of the City of Albany for the following position:

Title of Position:                   

Member, Citizens’ Police Review Board (CPRB)

Term of Appointment:        

One Vacancy expiring 10/26/17

Appointees are eligible for reappointment at the end of their term to an additional term of three years.

Position Responsibilities/Duties:

The CPRB is an independent body established by the City of Albany in 2000 to improve communications between the Police Department and the Community, to increase police accountability and credibility with the public, and to create a complaint review process that is free from bias and informed of actual police practice.  In addition to review and determination on completed investigations of complaints made by citizens against officers of the City of Albany Police Department for alleged misconduct, the nine member Board may make recommendations to the Common Council and the Mayor regarding police policies and practices relevant to the goals of community policing and the exercise of discretionary authority by police officers.  Board members are appointed by the Mayor (4) and the Common Council (5).  The Board is required to, among other things, undergo significant training, and engage in public outreach and education.

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

8 Surprising Facts About Your Local Librarian

What you may not know about your local children’s or young adult (YA) librarian could fill, well, a library.

“Librarians are much more than stuffy ladies who check out books,” says Katherine Peery, a former children’s librarian in the Dallas-Fort Worth area who now teaches first-year librarians at the University of Texas, Arlington. “In fact, there is a science behind selecting materials and using them to engage children in reading and the world around them,” she says.

Yup — it’s called library science for a reason. And the staff manning the YA desk? They know more about what tweens and teens are plugged into than you think, making them an invaluable resource.

More from Read Brightly

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Imagining the Design of the Library That Does Everything

The traditional image of the library as a quiet repository for the written word is less true today than it has ever been. Arguably, libraries have never been merely homes for books, but carry with them an aura of intellectualism that reflexively expands. Today, libraries fulfill myriad roles: community hubs, co-working spaces, depositories for local resources, information, and creativity. They offer children's storytimes, de facto babysitting for older kids, job training, ESL classes, discussion groups, safe space for tutoring, elder care, and more.

This month's proposal for The Architect's City hitches a piggyback ride on last week's symposium, organized by New York's Center for an Urban Future in collaboration with The Architectural League of New York, sharing architects' and designers' takes on the future of the branch library in New York City. Attendance at New York's three library systems—Brooklyn, Queens, and New York, which includes the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island—is rising. Citywide, circulation spiked 59 percent in the last decade.

More from Curbed
.

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

NY man returns library statue 43 years overdue

A 52-year-old New York man has returned a marble sculpture he borrowed in the early 1970s to get him through troubled times.

Scott Stewart tells the Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester (http://on.rocne.ws/1zvxsQ7 ) that as a 9-year-old he spent his days at the Rochester Central Library and was allowed to take home art pieces.

In 1971, he borrowed a small statue of an owl protecting its babies because it symbolized his mother's efforts to care for him and his brother.

More from the Times Union

Training L.A. librarians to teach science

Longtime Boing Boing pal Tara "Tiger" Brown co-founded LA Makerspace, the first kid and family-friendly makerspace/hackerspace in Los Angeles. Today, she shares word of a terrific new crowdfunding project:

The LA Makerspace has a Kickstarter to raise money to train LA Public Librarians how to run workshops in electronics, robotics, programming, film and Minecraft. We have all sorts of staggering stats around why we need to outside the school system for kids to learn anything...90% of Los Angeles Unified School District 8th graders test below proficient in science and 82% are below proficient in math. It's insane.

And we have more info on why hands-on learning like with maker workshops like the ones we run can improve all of that.

We are providing professional development for librarians because our vision is for every librarian at all 73 LA Public library branches to be trained in running workshops which means that you can go to your local library and take these free workshops and gain amazing skills.



More from BoingBoing

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

DRM blocks blind people's right to read

Any digital text can be read aloud through text-to-speech, granting people with visual impairments the basic human right to read -- unless there's DRM in the way.

Tricking the technology used by Amazon, Apple, Adobe and Google to stop blind people from adding text-to-speech to their devices isn't hard -- but it is a felony, thanks to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. A UN treaty intended to help people with visual, cognitive and sensory disabilities access copyrighted works has been all but killed by the big publishers.

Groups representing blind people have asked the US Copyright Office to renew the very narrow exemption that allows legally blind people to jailbreak their devices to add text-to-speech, but no one knows if they'll get it. And even if they do, it remains a felony to make or supply the tools that allow blind people to undertake this feat.

More from BoingBoing

Sunday, December 14, 2014

In My Library: Alan Alda

There’s a reason why there’s an Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University: The “M*A*S*H” star is obsessed with finding ways we can better understand the natural world.

Alda’s even set up the Flame Challenge, in which scientists compete to answer questions such as this year’s puzzler, “What is sleep?” in ways an 11-year-old can comprehend (a panel of them will pick the winner).

Given his fascination with phenomena, one wonders if Alda ever had to choose between science and acting.

“No, never,” he says. “I always wanted to be an actor and a writer. But as a little boy I’d do experiments, trying to see if I could get something to blow up. I did get my parents to explode. In anger!”

More from the New York Post.

Thursday, December 11, 2014

FCC Continues E-rate Reboot to Meet Nation's Digital Learning Needs

Taking significant additional steps to ensure that the nation’s schools and libraries have access to robust high-speed broadband connections, the Federal Communications Commission this week approved further modernization of its E-rate program, the nation’s largest program supporting education technology.

Broadband is transforming 21st Century education and life-long learning. The Commission is implementing a fundamental reset of E-rate, the first such effort since the program’s creation 18 years ago, so that it can keep pace with the exploding demands for ever-faster Internet service placed on school and library networks by digital learning applications, which often rely on individually connected tablets and laptops.

The Commission adopted an Order aimed at closing this connectivity gap by making more funding available for libraries and schools to purchase broadband connectivity capable of delivering gigabit service over the next five years. The Order also provides schools and libraries additional flexibility and options for purchasing broadband services to enable schools and libraries to meet their Internet capacity needs in the most cost-effective way possible.

The Order builds on action taken by the Commission in July to meet another critical need: robust Wi-Fi networks inside libraries and schools capable of supporting individualized learning.

More from the FCC

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Why Does Music Education Matter?

Because administrators and politicians generally view music as an “add-on” or “special,” it can be the first program cut from a school facing budget constraints. As a result, supporters of music education constantly struggle to justify music’s importance. They might show how music improves math scores and increases school attendance, or they may demonstrate that the focus and discipline required to master an instrument improve students’ overall academic performance.

Proponents of music education may also discuss one of the most compelling effects of music—the fact that creating music requires individual competence (based on practice and discipline) combined with attentiveness to others in an ensemble, and that this balance prepares children for success in any work or personal environment. They may also point out that learning to lead an ensemble, whether as a conductor, band leader, or first chair in an orchestra, is excellent preparation for leadership of any kind.

They’re right, of course, about all those things. But the underlying reason that music helps improve nearly every area of a child’s life is that music is a critical and necessary part of the human experience.

Read more from The Singing Classroom

Friday, December 05, 2014

To the despair of librarians everywhere, marginalia has marched on

Were you one of those students who, despite your teachers’ warnings, continued to write in your books? If so, you have a lot of company—some of it illustrious (no pun intended). And now, there are a number of efforts going on around the world to capture these scribbled snippets of wisdom.

The notion of “marginalia,” or making handwritten notes and drawings in the margins of book pages, dates back as far as the Middle Ages. Presumably, monks made random drawings and notes to relieve the tedium of the manuscripts they were copying. Once mechanical printing started, marginalia really took off as scholars of the day held debates with the books they were reading—not so different from comment sections on websites.

See more at Simplicity.

There's also a discussion taking place on Reddit.

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Final Community Farmers’ Market for the season: Delaware branch of APL Tuesday 11/25

This Tuesday, November 25 is the final Delaware Community Farmers’ Market from 3 to 6 pm behind the library at 331 Delaware Ave. This is your chance to stock up on apples, garlic, jam, greens and more. Stop by to say “see you next summer” to our favorite local farmers. EBT and WIC coupons welcome. We are very grateful to our customers for your support of this long running urban rural partnership for better health, economy and environment.
Perhaps you shouldn't bring your turkey to the market. They might use fowl language.

(Stolen from Leah Golby's email)

Friday, November 21, 2014

Thanksgiving - there's a free app for that

Auburn University’s Food Systems Institute has teamed up with Suffolk County Community College in Selden, New York, to create a new holiday app just in time for Thanksgiving. The one-of-a-kind multimedia app brings together a wealth of useful and fun information for the upcoming holidays.

The Food Systems Institute aims to promote collaborations between different colleges and schools within Auburn University, as well as between the university and outside colleges. The opportunity to collaborate with a community college which offers a culinary arts program was too good to pass up, Food Institute Director Pat Curtis said.

“Our purpose with this free app is to create a comprehensive resource for you to enjoy, learn and use,” Curtis explained. “It is full of useful information from faculty at both schools. I think people will be surprised at just how much fun this publication has turned out to be.”

The app includes written articles about food safety and planning a feast as well as information about and recipes for favorite holiday foods.

Thursday, November 20, 2014

The Science, and Surveys on Benefits of Reading (Ebooks and Hard Copy Books)

Most of us already know the importance of reading for our kids, and that reading is the best indicator of success in school. But here are some more studies supporting why reading is so important for everyone whether they're in or out of school.

Reading reduces stress

More from Departing the Text

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Use of Social Media by the Library: Current Practices and Future Opportunities

http://web.docuticker.com/go/docubase/71966 DocuTicker Editors highlight a favorite "Editor's Pick":

In the early days, social media were not commonly envisaged by librarians as having much practical relevance. But with the continuing development of more platforms and channels, the use by libraries of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc is becoming not only more common, but also for a greater range of purposes.

While at present chiefly focussed on promotion and outreach, social media is also being used to promote dialogue with users and customers. Hosting of library resources via social media is a further aspect of current developments, although this raises copyright issues.

Despite the increasing adoption of social media its actual impact is currently uncertain, although potential metrics are being developed. It is one aspect of a future which this report envisages, in which social media are increasingly integrated into the work of libraries.
***

From our survey, over 70% of libraries are using social media tools, and 60% have had a social media account for three years or longer. 30% of librarians are posting at least daily. Facebook and Twitter remain the most popular channels currently, but the range of channels being used is expanding rapidly; there is a particular acceleration of interest in visual channels such as YouTube, Pinterest and Snapchat...


Read the White Paper.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Neil Gaiman: Libraries are cultural 'seed corn'

A feral child who was raised in libraries

Neil: I was probably three or four when I first started going to libraries. We moved up to Sussex when I was five, and I discovered the local library very, very quickly. But I wasn’t really hooked until I got to the point where I was old enough to persuade my parents to just take me to the library and leave me there, which would have probably been about seven or eight. And at that point it was like being given the keys to the kingdom.

More from The Guardian.

Monday, November 17, 2014

Leonard Tucker Obituary

The Friends of Albany Public Library just lost one of our dear members and former president, Mr. Leonard Tucker. Lenny, as we all knew him, was a distinguished veteran of World War II. Beloved husband of the late Naomi Tucker, also well-loved by the Friends.

Service Monday noon, November 17, 2014, at Levine Memorial Chapel, 649 Washington Ave in Albany.

Rest in peace, dear friend.
***
Tucker, Leonard SCHENECTADY Leonard Tucker, founder of the Casual Set and actor, died on Thursday, November 13, 2014, at Kingsway Arms Nursing Center in Schenectady. He was 95. He was a man of many passions, foremost of which were his family, his business, and his acting career. Those who knew him will always remember his great sense of humor.

He was born into a large family in Bayonne, N.J., in 1919. In spite of being raised in poverty and frequently encountering anti-Semitism, he always had an optimistic view of life and what he could accomplish. He had a powerful drive to succeed. His love of the stage began in childhood when his mother took him to New York City to see Yiddish theatre. He ran track and played football at Thomas Jefferson High School in Elizabeth, N.J., and worked every day in his mother's grocery store.

He met the love of his life, Naomi Levenson, as a teenager, and they married at 19, a marriage that would last 73 years until Naomi's death in 2013. They loved to dance and dance they did! Starting on the boardwalks of Atlantic City, N.J., dancing to the live music of big bands like Tommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller, they continued strutting into their 90s (see them on YouTube).

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Amazon and Hachette Resolve Dispute

The accord allows the publisher to set prices on its e-books, a major issue in a battle that led Amazon to discourage sales of Hachette books. “If anyone thinks this is over, they are deluding themselves. Amazon covets market share the way Napoleon coveted territory.”

More from the New York Times.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

NANOvember Family Day - Saturday, November 22

The CNSE Children’s Museum of Science and Technology will open its doors at no cost during this event that will give attendees an exciting hands-on adventure into the world of nanotechnology. Families will be able to experience nanotechnology exhibits and other hands-on activities, including the reading of a science-focused story followed by the chance for visitors to explore concepts related to size by using a tiny ruler and scented balloons. Children will also be able to engage in activities that showcase nature-inspired applications of nanotechnology.

Pre-register for NANOvember events

This is part of the annual month-long celebration of Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) showcasing the exciting world of nanotechnology and the global leadership of CNSE and NYS in the most important science of the 21st century!

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Librarians say fines are incentive, but results are positive where payments have disappeared

A wave of libraries across the nation stopped charging late fees in the 1990s, but the trend never found a foothold in the Capital Region. Two tiny libraries — Poestenkill is the other one — are the only public libraries in the area without fines.

Several local librarians dream of dropping fines, but have not.

Here's the truth about late fines: They raise money for libraries, and they motivate procrastinators to return their books.

Those dimes and quarters add up.

Late fines generated $720,000 for Capital Region libraries in 2013, according to figures libraries provided to the Times Union.

More from the Times Union.

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Elementary School Replaces Desks With “Reading Bikes” And Student Test Scores Skyrocket

Ward Elementary School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina has found the formula for effective — and healthy — learning. Five years ago, the school began their ingenious Read and Ride program where one classroom in the school was filled up with donated exercise bikes for the students to use while they read… Turns out that this has been the catalyst for some real changes in how the students measure up academically.

More from InspireMore

There's also a discussion going on at Reddit.

NASA Posts a Huge Library of Space Sounds, And You’re Free To Use Them

Space is the place. Again.

And SoundCloud is now a place you can find sounds from the US government space agency, NASA. In addition to the requisite vocal clips ("Houston, we've had a problem" and "The Eagle has landed"), you get a lot more. There are rocket sounds, the chirps of satellites and equipment, lightning on Jupiter, interstellar plasma and radio emissions. And in one nod to humanity, and not just American humanity, there’s the Soviet satellite Sputnik (among many projects that are international in nature).

Many of these sounds were available before... But putting them on SoundCloud makes them much easier to browse and find, and there are download links...

Another thing: you’re free to use all of these sounds as you wish, because NASA’s own audio isn't copyrighted. It’s meant to be a public service to the American people of their taxpayer-funded government program, but that extends to everyone.

More from Created Digital Music.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Public forum for Albany school board candidates Monday

A reminder that the second of two public forums for this year's school board candidates will be held Monday at 7 p.m. at the Pine Hills branch of the Albany Public Library.
Four candidates are seeking two seats in the Nov. 4 elections. Visit the district website for more information. Monday's forum is sponsored by the Montessori Community Council (Montessori Magnet School's version of a parent-teacher association).
You also can visit the Times Union website for coverage of the first candidates' forum Oct. 22.

Nanovember: CNSE Community Day November 1

The Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) at SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) will hold its annual month-long celebration showcasing the exciting world of nanotechnology and the global leadership of CNSE and NYS in the most important science of the 21st century!

CNSE Community Day
Saturday, November 1, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Receive an up-close look at the world of nanotechnology as CNSE invites residents of the Capital Region and New York State to tour its Albany NanoTech Complex. Similar events are being held in Utica and Rochester. Pre-registration is available on the event website.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

LIBRARY WORKERS: FACTS & FIGURES

Libraries and library staff provide essential services for schools, universities, and communities. Americans use libraries for free, reliable, and organized access to books, the Internet, and other sources of information and entertainment; assistance finding work; research and reference assistance; and programs for children, immigrants, and other groups with specific needs, just to name a few.

This fact sheet explores: library staff in the workforce, diversity within the professions, educational attainment of library workers, the role of women in the professions, issues of pay and pay equity, and the union difference for library staff.

An Overview of Library Professionals and Libraries

 In 2013, there were 194,000 librarians, 39,000 library technicians, and 87,000 library assistants. Generally, the definition of “librarian” is a person who holds at least a master’s degree in library science or meets state teaching license standards for being a school librarian.
“Library technicians” assist librarians in the acquisition, preparation, and organization of materials “and assist users in locating the appropriate resources.”
“Library assistants” are similar to library technicians, but may have fewer responsibilities.

 From 2007 through 2013, library employment among librarians and library technicians and assistants shrank from 380,000 to 320,000.

MORE from HERE.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Invitation - Keeping the Promise of Pre-K: Using Technology to Ensure Quality

The Rockefeller Institute of Government of SUNY and ReadyNation New York invite you to a forum entitled Keeping the Promise of Pre-K: Using Technology to Ensure Quality on Wednesday, November 12, 2014,from 11 a.m. ---- 1 p.m. at the Rockefeller Institute, 411 State Street in Albany. The event is free and open to the public and parking is provided.

High-quality Pre-K has demonstrated significant individual and societal benefits, including an economic return on investment, increased high school graduation rates, reduced criminal activity, and improved health outcomes. This forum will explore the role of policy and technology in ensuring that New York State continues to provide Pre-K services ---- and design an early learning system ---- in an effective and sustainable way, to achieve the best results.

The Keynote address will be delivered by NYS State Education Department Commissioner John B. King, Jr.

Panelists:

Monday, October 20, 2014

Scholar, courtier, magician to Queen Elizabeth I: the lost library of John Dee

January – July 2016

A major exhibition revealing the fascinating life, times and lost library of Queen Elizabeth I’s most famous ‘conjurer’.

John Dee (1527–1609) is one of the most intriguing characters of 16th century England. A member of the Elizabethan court, he is infamous for his attempts to make contact with other-worldly spirits and his study and practice of alchemy. He was also a mathematician and scholar of navigation, a founding fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, a university lecturer on rhetoric, and an astrologer.

Dee’s library was one of the most famous collections of books and manuscripts of its time, as renowned for its contents as for the fact it was pillaged and dispersed while Dee was travelling in Europe during the 1580s.

More from the Royal College of Physicians.

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Batman’s 75th Anniversary Celebration at Albany Public Library branches

BatmanThis year marks the 75th anniversary of the birth of Batman! We love comic books and graphic novels, and we are celebrating this cool event in geek culture with some fun programs featuring the Dark Knight:

HOLY MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES, BATMAN!

Our very own comics expert and all around smart and awesome guy, Gene Kannenberg, will present a highly illustrated look back at the Caped Crusader's many pop culture incarnations over the past 75 years. All ages, but might be best for kids in grades 3 and up, teens, and adults. You have two opportunities to check it out:

Thursday, October 23 | 4-5PM | Howe Branch
Friday, October 24 | 4-5PM | Pine Hills Branch

Also at our Pine Hills Branch, we've got some fun activities for kids and teens:

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Why Your Library May Soon Have Laser Cutters and 3-D Printers

But what about books? Public Library Association research shows that people have checked out slightly fewer materials in recent years. And Pew found that about a third of patrons are opposed to makerspaces if they displace books. But while I'm just as sentimental about the primacy of hard copy, the librarians aren't. As they all tell me, their job is helping with access to knowledge—not all of which comes in codex form and much of which is deeply social. Libraries aren't just warehouses for documents; they're places to exchange information...

You have to give the librarians credit. Stereotype says they're fusty, but the reality is absolutely the opposite. Over and over they've adapted to new information tools, from microfiche to CD-ROMs to the Internet. Now this—possibly the best example I've seen of how a storied institution embraces change.


More from WIRED.

Friday, October 17, 2014

20th Congressional District Forum October 28

Meet the candidates Paul Tonko (Democrat, Independence , Working Families) and Jim Fischer (Republican, Conservative) on Tuesday, October 28 from 7 to 8:30 pm at Stephen and Harriet Myers Middle School, on 100 Elbel Court, in Albany.

Candidate Night Sponsors: The Albany Branch of the NAACP, League of Women Voters of Albany County, George Biddle Kelly Education Foundation, Capital Area Urban League, Council of Albany Neighborhood Associations, Capital Area Council of Churches, and The Reform Jewish Voice of New York State

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Librarians on the vanguard of the anti-surveillance movement

The American Library Association's code of ethics demands that library professionals "protect each library user's right to privacy and confidentiality" and they've been taking that duty seriously since the first days of the Patriot Act.

The history of libraries in the post-9/11 fight is a proud and honorable one, with librarians putting their jobs and honor on the line to stand up for the right of people to conduct intellectual inquiry without government surveillance, and to stand against secret wiretaps that come with perpetual gag orders.

More from BoingBoing.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Albany City School Board of Education in forum on October 22 and 27

This year's candidates for the Albany City School Board of Education will participate in a school board forum on Wednesday, October 22 from 6-7:30 p.m. at Stephen and Harriet Myers Middle School. Four candidates are seeking two seats in the November elections – Kenneth Bruce, Edith Leet, Sharon Rowe and Anne Savage.
Forum Sponsors- The Albany City Council Parent Teacher Association (ACCPTA) Albany Branch of the NCAAP, League of Women Voters of Albany County, George Biddle Kelly Education Foundation, Capital Area Urban League, Council of Albany Neighborhood Associations (CANA), Capital Area Council of Churches, and Reform Jewish Voice of New York State.

If you miss that one, the school board candidates will present again on Monday, October 27 at 7 pm at the Pine Hills Library.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Can't find your rutabaga?

Perhaps it will turnip at the Farmers' Market, Tuesdays, 4 to 7 pm behind the Delaware Avenue branch of the Albany Public Library, 331 Delaware Ave. We know you will find greens, apples, squash, garlic, eggs, tomatoes, potatoes, honey, jam, pumpkins. This week Bungelow Bakery will make a special visit with cookies, breads and something gluten-free. WIC coupons and EBT cards welcome. If you use your EBT card, you get a coupon for more nutritious affordable food. Next Tuesday, the market hours will shift earlier to 3 to 6 pm.

Thursday, October 09, 2014

Friends of the Albany Public Library programs for Tuesdays at noon in October, November and December 2014

All events at the 161 Washington Avenue branch in the auditorium. Light refreshments provided

October 14—Book Review—Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty. Reviewer: Paul Hohenberg, PhD, professor of economics, RPI.

October 21—Author Talk—Josh Ruebner discusses his book Shattered Hopes: Obama’s Failure to Broker Israeli-Palestinian Peace.

October 28—Book Review—The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumphs by Ryan Holiday & Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. Reviewer: Scott C. Jarzombek, MLS, Director, Albany Public Library.

Tuesday, October 07, 2014

Writer Paul Pines at Albany Public Library, November 8

Please Join The Friends of the Albany Public Library for the Fall Book & Author Event

Saturday, November 8, 2014
Main Auditorium, Albany Public Library, 161 Washington Avenue,
Albany – 1:30 p.m.

Speaker: Paul Pines


PaulPinesDivine Madness

Friday, October 03, 2014

2016 Diversity Immigrant Visa Lottery Now Open

The Diversity Immigrant Visa (DV) Program, also known as the Green Card Lottery, makes a limited number of immigrant visas available every year to people meeting certain eligibility requirements. If you have family members or friends living outside the U.S. who would like to enter the lottery, here’s what they should know:

The 2016 DV lottery registration period will run from October 1 to November 3, 2014.
To participate in the lottery:

Thursday, October 02, 2014

Science Has Great News for People Who Read Actual Books

It's no secret that reading is good for you. Just six minutes of reading is enough to reduce stress by 68%, and numerous studies have shown that reading keeps your brain functioning effectively as you age. One study even found that elderly individuals who read regularly are 2.5 times less likely to develop Alzheimer's than their peers. But not all forms of reading are created equal.

The debate between paper books and e-readers has been vicious since the first Kindle came out in 2007. Most arguments have been about the sentimental versus the practical, between people who prefer how paper pages feel in their hands and people who argue for the practicality of e-readers. But now science has weighed in, and the studies are on the side of paper books.

Reading in print helps with comprehension.

A 2014 study found that readers of a short mystery story on a Kindle were significantly worse at remembering the order of events than those who read the same story in paperback. Lead researcher Anne Mangen of Norway's Stavanger University concluded that "the haptic and tactile feedback of a Kindle does not provide the same support for mental reconstruction of a story as a print pocket book does."

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Kevin Hickey reviews The Broken Road by Patrick Leigh Fermor September 30

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.


September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Try Your Local Library Instead of a Coffee Shop to Get Work Done

When you think of a library, most people think of a quiet place to study. If you want to get work done and spread out, you go to a coffee shop. Newer libraries offer the same amenities as coffee shops, and sometimes even more.

Fast Company says libraries have turned into great workspaces.

More from LifeHacker.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Banned Book Week: Ensuring Everyone Has a Choice

In honor of Banned Books Week - September 21-27, 2014 Meryl Jaffe thought she'd share clips from articles and resources to ensure that everyone has the option to read what they choose.

This year, Banned Books Week 2014 events and celebrations will emphasize a thematic focus on comics and graphic novels.

So in the spirit of spreading awareness of how schools, libraries and individuals can fight censorship, below, are some wonderful links both from School Library Journal, the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, and additional recommended resources:

School Library Journal has two outstanding articles that discusses comic and graphic novels in schools: the challenges they face and why it's a fight worth fighting. Teaching With Graphic Novels by Brigid Alverson, School Library Journal September 8, 2014 relates that:
This is the paradox of graphic novels: The visual element that gives them their power can also make them vulnerable to challenges. Researcher Steven Cary calls this the “naked buns” effect...

At the same time, graphic novels are increasingly used in the classroom. For over a decade, public librarians have been promoting graphic novels as literature, and researchers have studied their benefits in educational settings.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Ronald Helfrich reviews the novel The Master and Marguirita by Michael Bulgakov September 23

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.



September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Neil Gaiman's library (2009)

we asked one of our all-time favorites, Neil Gaiman, if he’d be willing to give us a peek into his personal library, and he graciously agreed.

Gaiman first gained wide acclaim with his complex and literate 75-issue comic series The Sandman, and has since broadened his scope to write award-winning and bestselling novels (American Gods, Anansi Boys), screenplays (“Beowulf”) and yes, he still continues to write comics.

Naturally we’d assumed that someone whose work is filled with references ranging from literary to mythological would have a fairly extensive library but even so, we were a bit unprepared for the scope of what he sent us. In the basement of his house of secrets we find a room that’s wall-to-wall and floor-to-ceiling with books (along with a scattering of awards, gargoyles and felines).

More from Shelfari.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Chicago, NY, Hawaii on Obama Library's Short List

The Barack Obama Foundation, which is developing and raising money for the massive legacy project, announced Monday that it has selected four universities to compete for the library, culled from an initial list of 13 applications submitted earlier this year. The University of Hawaii, in Obama's birthplace Honolulu, made the cut, as did New York's Columbia University. The University of Chicago, where Obama used to teach, and the University of Illinois at Chicago round out the list.

More from Newsmax

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Radical Librarianship: how ninja librarians are ensuring patrons' electronic privacy

Librarians in Massachusetts are working to give their patrons a chance to opt-out of pervasive surveillance. Partnering with the ACLU of Massachusetts, area librarians have been teaching and taking workshops on how freedom of speech and the right to privacy are compromised by the surveillance of online and digital communications -- and what new privacy-protecting services they can offer patrons to shield them from unwanted spying of their library activity.

It's no secret that libraries are among our most democratic institutions. Libraries provide access to information and protect patrons' right to explore new ideas, no matter how controversial or subversive. Libraries are where all should be free to satisfy any information need, be it for tax and legal documents, health information, how-to guides, historical documents, children's books, or poetry.

More from BoingBoing.net

Friday, September 12, 2014

Author talk: Kwane Somburu,, author of A Succinct Analysis September 16

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.


September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Millennials Are Better-Read, Vastly Superior to Rest of Population

On Thursday, as A.O. Scott mourned the death of adulthood in American culture (R.I.P.), a new study by the Pew Research Center confirmed that it's young adults who are keeping American (literary) culture alive. Contrary to reports that have questioned whether or not millennials read, younger Americans actually read more than their older counterparts: 88 percent of Americans younger than 30 reported having read a book in the past year, compared with 79 percent of those older than 30.

What’s more, libraries are not a cherished refuge of the old, but a destination for the young: In a September 2013 survey, 50 percent of respondents between the ages of 16 and 29 had used a library in the past year, compared with 47 percent of their older counterparts, and 36 percent of people under 30 had used a library website in that same time frame; compared with 28 percent of the over-30s.

More from Slate.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

48 Library Stories You May Have Missed

The last month of the summer was chock-full of library and information stories ranging from articles about special collections, eBooks, library robots, and Legos to digital citizinship, makerspaces, and gamified instruction! Check out these 48 posts, infographics, and articles to get you caught up on what’s happening in the LIS world.

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Library Programs2 Symposium - creative program opportunities for your library, school or social group

Library Programs2 is bringing new and innovative types of programming information to libraries, schools and other institutions across the Capital District region and beyond. The group is holding a symposium on October 9, 2014, from 1 pm to 3:30 pm at the University at Albany, Campus Center Ballroom.

This event features exhibits of programs from educational, entertainment and cultural programming specialists. These informative displays will highlight presentations and demonstrations that will focus on education, entertainment, and cultural awareness, creating new programming opportunities to bring back to your institution. And it’s FREE.

Library Programs2 includes over 45 different presenters who offer a variety of programs, classes and demonstrations. We will also have fabulous door prizes and light refreshments.

Please go to the website for additional information.

The organizers are the University at Albany IST601 class for Summer 2014. They are all graduate students in the Information Science program at the University at Albany and will one day be planning their own educational programming at various institutions.

An RSVP would be nice (not necessary) either to cgerm ain@albany.edu (the class instructor) or via the RSVP link at http://libraryprogramssquared.wordpress.com/.

See you on October 9th!

Thursday, September 04, 2014

Richard King reviews Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis September 9

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.


September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

NYCLU Banned Books Week Event at Albany Public Library

On Tuesday, September 23rd, 6PM, the New York State Civil Liberties Union, Capital Region Chapter will sponsor a local ReadOut! at the Albany Public Library Main Branch!

A ReadOut is an event where local actors, writers, poets, and prominent community leaders read brief excerpts from books that have been banned or challenged in America. Historically, people have read from children books, classics, and modern works of literature.


Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

One of this year's readers will be APL Executive Director Scott Jarzombek.

If you have any questions regarding the event, feel free to contact Joanna Palladino at Joanna.Palladino@gmail.com or John Cirrin at millais@nycap.rr.com

Thursday, August 28, 2014

David Guistina reviews Physics of the Future by Michio Kaku September 2

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.


September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

7 Things Librarians Are Tired of Hearing

We’ve all heard them. Probably more than once or twice. These are the reactions and responses librarians receive when they introduce themselves to those who aren’t in the field.

1) “Do people still even go to the library now that there’s Google?” [Yes, I HAVE heard this!]

More HERE!

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

What the 'death of the library' means for the future of books

From The Week:

Forbes contributor Tim Worstall wants us to close public libraries and buy everyone an Amazon Kindle with an unlimited subscription. "Why wouldn't we simply junk the physical libraries and purchase an Amazon Kindle Unlimited subscription for the entire country?" he asks. Worstall points to substantial savings on public funds, arguing that people would have access to a much larger collection of books through a Kindle Unlimited subscription than they could get through any public library and that the government would spend far less on a bulk subscription for all residents than it ever would on funding libraries.

Is he right? Are libraries obsolete? He might be correct — but only if libraries were just about books, which they are not. Libraries are actually an invaluable public and social resource that provide so much more than simple shelves of books (or, for those in rural areas, a Bookmobile like the one this author grew up with). A world without public libraries is a grim one indeed, and the assault on public libraries should be viewed as alarming.

Humans have been curating libraries for as long as they've been creating written materials, whether they be tablets, scrolls, handwritten books, or printed mass-media. They've become archives not just of books on a variety of subjects, but also newspapers, genealogical materials, art, and more. Notably, early libraries were primarily private, with only wealthy individuals maintaining stocks of printed materials due to their expense.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Close The Libraries And Buy Everyone An Amazon Kindle Unlimited Subscription

A terrible, short-sighted (tongue-in-check, I hope) suggestion from Forbes.

Herein some of the responses:

Do you not understand the plethora of other resources available to library patrons outside of books? How would a subscription to this service replace those services? Libraries offer such free services as: counseling with a lawyer or social worker, internet access, access to printers and copiers (sometimes for a fee), ESL classes, multitudes of programming for children and teens, a community hub for learning and socialization, among many other resources. Libraries/librarians are often on the forefront of activism for privacy rights, particularly in the United States. How does a service such as Amazon’s lending program advocate for its community?

In regards to book lending itself, the Amazon service is severely limited [and] does not include a wealth of titles available through other services, including libraries.
***
If you added up the real costs (labor, planning, staff knowledge, etc.) involved in the work libraries do, it would be far more than is ever received in financial support from their communities. Libraries are one of the few truly public services where you can say, you get MORE than you pay for.

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Denver Tang reviews the novel A Free Life by Ha Jin August 26

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Why the Public Library Beats Amazon—for Now

The Wall Street Journal.

A growing stack of companies would like you to pay a monthly fee to read e-books, just like you subscribe to Netflix to binge on movies and TV shows.

Don't bother. Go sign up for a public library card instead.

Really, the public library? Amazon.com recently launched Kindle Unlimited, a $10-per-month service offering loans of 600,000 e-books. Startups called Oyster and Scribd offer something similar. It isn't very often that a musty old institution can hold its own against tech disrupters.

But it turns out librarians haven't just been sitting around shushing people while the Internet drove them into irrelevance. More than 90% of American public libraries have amassed e-book collections you can read on your iPad, and often even on a Kindle. You don't have to walk into a branch or risk an overdue fine. And they're totally free.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Gene Damm reviews Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout August 19

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.


August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Saturday, August 09, 2014

Architecture gawking in Albany's warehouse district

From AllOverAlbany:

The recently announced project to develop plans for reusing a handful of historic industrial buildings around the Capital Region -- and specifically, a very early plan for a restaurant/residential conversion on Broadway in Albany -- got us thinking (again) about Albany's warehouse district.

It's one of those areas that might necessarily jump out as a place with notable buildings, but there is interesting architecture there. And the neighborhood might have a lot of potential.

Friday, August 08, 2014

Teaching Kids How to Handle Bullying

Bullying can leave lasting emotional scars on a kid. The way teachers, parents and other adults respond to bullying affects the way kids perceive and respond to it, as well. Stopbullying.gov defines bullying behavior; identifies the warning signs of bullying and ways to prevent it; helps adults recognize kids who may be at risk; and provides information on how to respond to bullying when it happens.

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Donald Hyman reviews the House on Sugar Beach by Helene Cooper August 12

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.


August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Monday, August 04, 2014

"Fair Use Is A Right" featuring the Dramatic Chipmunk

The Center for Media & Social Impact at American University, formerly the Center for Social Media, is an innovation lab and research center that studies, designs, and showcases media for social impact. Focusing on independent, documentary and public media, the Center bridges boundaries between scholars, producers and communication practitioners across media production, media impact, public policy and audience engagement. The Center produces resources for the field and academic research; convenes conferences and events; and works collaboratively to understand and design media that matters.

Here's a short video they've produced on the topic of fair use.

Saturday, August 02, 2014

James Baldwin would be 90

Last year, Arthur@AmeriNZ posted this item about James Baldwin on what would have been his 89th birthday. So, of course, Baldwin would have been 90 today.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Author talk: David Kalish, author of The Opposite of Everything August 5

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.


August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Librarians & Libraries in Comic Books

[Library] workers of all categories are quite commonly utilized in fictional settings, as main and supporting characters, as well as for incidental run-ins with those primary persons.

How exactly are those info-professionals portrayed, in both personality and in comportment? Does it depend on the medium, whether in film or novel, or sequential art? Are secondary characters more likely to be shown as negative librarian stereotypes than primary protagonists?

More HERE.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Roger Green reviews Thinking in Numbers by Daniel Tammet July 29

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

July 29—Book Review—Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math by Daniel Tammet. Reviewer: Roger Green, librarian & member of the board of the Friends of APL.



August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

School libraries in Racine, WI raided by untrained city workers, thousands of books discarded

School librarians say they weren't consulted about throwing away classics and important parts of the collection.

Librarians say the decision to send in the workers to pull books that were published before 2000 or that hadn't been checked out recently was made without any recourse to library science, the plan for the libraries, or the views of librarians. Many of the books are to be destroyed.

More HERE.

Monday, July 21, 2014

Albany removes ‘no left turn’ sign on Washington Avenue eastbound onto Dove Street

From Times Union "Getting There" blog:

Q... I park in a lot on Elk Street between Dove and Lark streets. There is a “no left turn” sign for cars travelling east on Washington [at Dove] and trying to get to Elk... That means that any employees or patrons of the library, Armory or any other establishment on that block have to go to Swan Street to make the left to get to Elk... Between 4 and 6 p.m., there is no left on Swan and we have to go another block [to Hawk]. This makes no sense.

— Marty Richmond, Fultonville

A: As a result of your question, the city removed the sign this past Wednesday, said Steve Smith, Albany’s spokesman on traffic issues.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Albany Public Library is looking for Albany school yearbooks



The Main Library at Albany Public Library is now accepting donations of yearbooks from the current and former schools in the city of Albany. Yearbooks should be in good condition, but can have signatures and messages written in them. Yearbook donations can be dropped off during normal library hours at the first floor circulation desk, the basement reception desk, or the reference desk of the Main Library at 161 Washington Avenue.

APL's collection of Albany yearbooks is housed within the Pruyn Collection of Albany History, which is located in the Albany History Room on the second floor of the Main Library.

A recently donated 1932 Albany High School yearbook has been digitized by APL and can be viewed for free through New York Heritage Digital Collections, an online portal designed for researchers and history buffs. You can view APL's digital collection, including the 1932 yearbook, at nyheritage.org.

For more information about donating, or viewing, Albany yearbooks, please call the Reference Department at 427-4303 or email localhistory@albanypubliclibrary.org.

NewsChannel 13 did a brief story about APL's yearbook project, which you can view online.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Frank Robinson reviews The Age of Atheists by Peter Watson July 22

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

July 22— Book Review— The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God by Peter Watson. Reviewer: Frank Robinson, JD, retired NYS administrative law judge, author, and self-described rational optimist.

July 29—Book Review—Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math by Daniel Tammet. Reviewer: Roger Green, librarian & member of the board of the Friends of APL.



August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Friday, July 11, 2014

Bill Shapiro reviews Simpler: the Future of Government by Cass Sunstein July 15

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

July 15— Book Review—Simpler: the Future of Government by Cass Sunstein. Reviewer: Bill Shapiro, attorney and lifelong student of international relations.

July 22— Book Review— The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God by Peter Watson. Reviewer: Frank Robinson, JD, retired NYS administrative law judge, author, and self-described rational optimist.

July 29—Book Review—Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math by Daniel Tammet. Reviewer: Roger Green, librarian & member of the board of the Friends of APL.



August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Saturday, July 05, 2014

David Colchamiro reviews The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 by Margaret MacMillan July 8

Book reviews or author talks every Tuesday at 12:15 p.m. at the main branch of the Albany Public Library auditorium, first floor. Light refreshments served.

July 8—Book Review—The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 by Margaret MacMillan. Reviewer: David Colchamiro, retired transportation analyst & member of the board of the Friends of APL.

July 15— Book Review—Simpler: the Future of Government by Cass Sunstein. Reviewer: Bill Shapiro, attorney and lifelong student of international relations.

July 22— Book Review— The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God by Peter Watson. Reviewer: Frank Robinson, JD, retired NYS administrative law judge, author, and self-described rational optimist.

July 29—Book Review—Thinking in Numbers: On Life, Love, Meaning, and Math by Daniel Tammet. Reviewer: Roger Green, librarian & member of the board of the Friends of APL.



August 5—Author Talk—The Opposite of Everything, a novel, by David Kalish, MFA, novelist, playwright, & screenwriter.

August 12— Book Review—The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood by Helene Cooper. Reviewer: Donald Hyman, writer & adjunct professor of American studies, College of St. Rose.

August 19— Book Review— Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington by Terry Teachout. Reviewer: Gene Damm, past president of the Friends of APL.

August 26— Book Review—A Free Life, a novel by Ha Jin. Reviewer: Denver Tang, doctoral candidate in Science & Technology Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.



September 2—Book Review—Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku. Reviewer: David Guistina, Morning Edition anchor/senior producer, WAMC.

September 9— Book Review—Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis. Reviewer: Richard King, retired attorney.

September 16— Author Talk—A Succinct Analysis by Kwame Somburu, scientific socialist & activist.

September 23— Book Review— The Master and Margarita, a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov. Reviewer: Ronald Helfrich, PhD, SUNY Oneonta.

September 30— Book Review—The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos by Patrick Leigh Fermor. Reviewer: Kevin Hickey, PhD, professor of English & Africana studies at Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences.

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

New Youth Library Card at the Albany Public Library

MyCARD Makes it Easier for Albany Kids and Teens to Access APL on Own

APL is making it easier for Albany youngsters to use the library with the new MyCARD. This library card allows Albany children to get a library card on their own and use it to borrow up to three items at a time, with no late fees. MyCARD also gives users access to the library's free public computers and to digital materials, like eBooks and eMagazines, which are available for free from the library's website.  
 
MyCARD is only available to city of Albany youth under the age of 18, and can only be used at APL's seven locations in the city of Albany. As part of the MyCARD rollout, which begins on June 27, Albany Public Library is waiving late fees on all current children's cards. This one-time waiver will put current children's cardholders on the same level playing field as new MyCARD cardholders.


"The benefit of MyCARD is that youngsters can come into the library on their own and get a card that lets them borrow up to three items at a time, and have the freedom to take as long as they need to read those books without racking up late fees," Assistant Director Melanie Metzger said. "Once done with a book, a MyCARD user can return it to the library and borrow another one. This new card gives children and teens an opportunity to explore the library, and the world of reading, on their own."

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

All Acronyms dictionary

I take requests.

"I thought you might be interested in writing about one useful resource.

"All Acronyms ( http://www.allacronyms.com) is a user-friendly dictionary for acronyms and abbreviations with a large number of terms included.

"Hope this helps!"



Monday, June 30, 2014

Summer Reading Fun at the Albany Public Library

Kids Earn Rewards for Reading and Participating in Free Activities
   
School is out and summer reading is in at Albany Public Library! Kids and teens are rewarded for reading, and participating in fun and educational library programs, from June 28 to August 16. (Grownups can get in on the summer reading fun through Goodreads.com.)

The Summer Reading Program provides dozens of free activities every week at Albany's libraries.  Kids can stop by their neighborhood library to:
  • Explore the world of science with hands-on experiments involving robotics, catapults, electricity, mirrors, sound, and more
  • Meet animals including chickens, salamanders, owls, honey bees, falcons, and snakes
  • Learn about such topics as dinosaurs, lightning, medieval machines, kitchen science, music production, pond ecology, and skyscrapers  
  • Create and sample yummy snacks made from cookies, berries, marshmallows, yogurt, ice cream, and other foods
  • Participate in games and building challenges using balloons, LEGOs, sticks, string, and tape
  • Make art using t-shirts, paint, candy, crayons, homemade paper, sand and other materials

The full Summer Reading Program guide details all of the free activities. The guide is available online and at all library locations. The 2014 APL Summer Reading Program is sponsored by the Friends of Albany Public Library, Price Chopper, and Stewart's Shops.
 

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Albany Public Library: Summer Program Guide Available

Tons of Great -- and Free -- Programs on Tap. Check out the latest APL program guide for details about all the wonderful activities, workshops, events, and programs scheduled for July, August, and September.

A Few Changes in the APL Schedule This Month:

ALL library locations are CLOSED on July 4

ONLY Main Library and Delaware Branch are OPEN on July 12. Delaware is hosting SummerFest, an outdoor family celebration with games, music, and refreshments, from 1 to 3 pm that afternoon.

Main Library is CLOSED on SUNDAYS in July and August

Carl Strock reviews Africa: A Biography of the Continent by John Reader July 1

Tuesday, July 1, 12:15 pm at the main branch of the Albany Public Library. Light refreshment served.

Book Review—Africa: A Biography of the Continent by John Reader. Reviewer: Carl Strock, journalist & author.

Thursday, June 26, 2014

The therapy dog for the Countway Library of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Let’s say you were an incoming freshman at Harvard University. You’d get your dorm assignment, pick your classes, buy your books, and set up a meal plan. A lot of those things require — or at least, are facilitated by — an official ID card. Harvard’s online campus service center has instructions as to how to obtain your card, and, on that page, informs the student that his or her Harvard ID card “provides access to housing, dining halls, libraries, Crimson Cash [a University-wide debit system], and more.”

Cooper Anderson, better known as Crimson Cooper, is a therapy dog.

More HERE.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

“Sherlock Holmes” Is Now Officially Off Copyright and Open for Business

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died in 1930, but his most famous work—stories about the English detective Sherlock Holmes—has lived on. Thanks to copyright law, those stories have also continued to benefit Doyle's heirs for the past 84 years. Every time someone wanted to write a story or film a movie about Sharlock Holmes, the Doyle estate would collect a fee. A legal ruling announced this week, however, has set Holmes free: the character and all his companions (as penned by Doyle) are now in the public domain.

The legal case of Klinger v. Conan Doyle Estate that settled the claim actually rested on an interesting issue, whether a copyright claim can persist on a character even if the works depicting that character have fallen out of copyright. The defense of the Doyle estate went something like this: sure, Arthur Conan Doyle's stories are now at least 90 years old, but other stories about Sherlock Holmes are still under copyright, therefore Sherlock Holmes is still under copyright.

Judge Richard Posner didn't buy the argument, and he ruled that Sherlock Holmes, the character, is now in the public domain.

Read more from Smithsonian magazine

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Library of Congress Launches Pinterest Boards

Continuing its effort to make its digital educational, historical and cultural resources available to web users across many platforms, the Library of Congress has launched an account on Pinterest, accessible at www.pinterest.com/LibraryCongress.

The Library is the repository to more than 158 million items of cultural and historical value, including more than 13.7 million photographs, 5.5 million maps, 6.7 million pieces of sheet music and 69 million manuscripts.

As a visually based content-sharing platform where users curate their own collections of multiformat items, Pinterest lends itself to the sharing of online Library of Congress content at the item level.

More from the Library of Congress.