Friday, December 31, 2010

Joseph F. Shubert, NYS Librarian Emeritus

From: Jeffrey W. Cannell, Deputy Commissioner for Cultural Education, New York State Education Department

I am sorry to tell you that Joseph F. Shubert, New York State Librarian and Assistant Commissioner for Libraries from 1977 to 1996, died November 24, 2010 in Plano, Texas. The family has communicated that there will be a memorial service at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Albany, New York on Saturday March 12, 2011 at 10:30 a.m.

Joe Shubert began his professional career as reference and documents librarian at the Nevada State Library in 1951, and also served as State Librarian of Nevada and Ohio. From 1962 to early 1966, he was Assistant Director of the American Library Association International Relations Office. His tenure at the New York State Library was exceeded only by that of James I. Wyer, who was State Librarian from 1908 to 1938. Mr. Shubert was the 19th State Librarian since the founding of the Library in 1818.

CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVING NEW YORK’S LIBRARY SERVICES FOR ALL

Mr. Shubert's 19 years included continuous improvement of the nation's most comprehensive library system and the nation's most respected State Library. Under his expert leadership, State funding for library development programs and statewide library services increased by $56 million, from $26 million annually in 1976 to $82 million annually in 1996. Library development programs that were instituted or greatly expanded during Shubert's tenure included:

o State aid for award-winning public library outreach services which touch the lives of people who are homebound, unemployed, incarcerated, speakers of languages other than English or persons struggling to overcome disabilities and disadvantages.

o State aid to library systems for database development and technology for resource sharing and broader access to information among all types of libraries - academic, public, school and special.

o State aid to library systems for a stellar program of resource sharing resulting in New York's consistent record in out-distancing all other states in public library interlibrary loan.

o Establishment of school library systems based in the Boards of Cooperative Education Services (BOCES) and the Five Big City school districts, leading to greater school library participation in resource sharing than in any other state.

o Establishment of the first comprehensive State-funded program in the nation dedicated to the ongoing conservation and preservation of rare, unique and fragile library materials for use by future generations.


NATIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

As State Librarian of Ohio, Mr. Shubert was one of the three founders of the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies in 1973. He was Chair of that organization and also chaired the legislative, statistics and other committees at various times. He also chaired the Legislation Committee of the 50,000-member American Library Association and was instrumental in advancing improvements in the federal Library Services and Construction Act.

For the Library of Congress, Mr. Shubert served on the Advisory Committee for the Center for the Book (1979-82) and as a member of the Network Advisory Committee (1981-96). He was a trustee of the Ohio College Library Center and OCLC Inc., served on the Depository Council to the Public Printer and was a trustee of the Northeast Document Conservation Center.

President Ford appointed him to the Advisory Committee for the 1979 White House Conference on Library and Information Services and he served on a planning group for the 1991 conference.

AWARDS, HONORS AND RECOGNITION

Mr. Shubert received distinguished alumnus awards from the University of Denver (1979), the SUNY College at Geneseo (1985), and the Distinguished Public Service award and medal from the Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs at the University at Albany (1987). The American Library Association division, the Association for Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) honored him in 1985 with the Exceptional Achievement Award for "distinguished service in strengthening the role of the state library on the national level".

In 1991, the Ohio Library Association designated him for the Ohio Library Hall of Fame. In 1996, he received both the New York Library Association’s Distinguished Service to Libraries Award and the New York State Association of Library Boards’ Velma K. Moore Award.

On the occasion of his 1996 retirement, The New York State Board of Regents named him State Librarian Emeritus and adopted a resolution at their meeting expressing thanks for "distinguished leadership in library and information services for all New Yorkers."

In his post-retirement years, Shubert worked with others to found the Committee for the New York State Library (now the Friends of the New York State Library), a not-for-profit group of readers, library users, scholars, historians, and others whose mission is to stimulate government and public support for the nation's greatest State Library. He continued to be active with that organization for many years.

RECOGNIZING SHUBERT’S CONTRIBUTIONS

In recognition of Mr. Shubert's many contributions to statewide library service, the Regents Advisory Council on Library Services established the Joseph F. Shubert Library Excellence Award which is presented annually to recognize achievements of small, medium, and large libraries and library consortia in New York State. The Friends of the New York State Library provides $1,000 for the winner of the Joseph F. Shubert Library Excellence Award in honor of Mr. Shubert's leadership and his tireless advocacy and unwavering commitment to high-quality library services for all New Yorkers.

Those interested in honoring Mr. Shubert's memory are invited to make a donation to the Friends of the New York State Library in support of the Joseph F. Shubert Library Excellence Award. Please send donations to the Friends of the New York State Library, PO Box 2247 Empire State Plaza Station, Albany, NY 12220 or to give online visit HERE. Please identify that the donation is in support of the Joseph F. Shubert Library Excellence Award. The Friends of the New York State Library is a private nonprofit 501 (c)(3) organization. All donations are tax-deductible.

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

NYS Military Museum Puts Info of 360,000 Civil War Soldiers Online

From an Oneida Daily Dispatch article:

As the Nation prepares to observe the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, the New York State Military History Museum and Veterans Research Center is making capsule histories of 360,000 New York Civil War Soldiers available online.

The entire roster of New Yorkers who served during the Civil War Years, 1861-1865, is now available online, as well as the five annual reports issued by the Bureau of Military Statistics from 1864 to 1868 that chronicle the accomplishments of New Yorkers in battle....

More than 360,000 Soldiers enlisted in New York regiments to fight for the Union during the Civil War. Capsule histories of those Soldiers military records were recorded from 1893 to 1906 in 17 volumes based on data from the New York Adjutant General's Office and the War Department, the predecessor to today's Department of the Army. These records have been posted in PDFformat and are searchable.

The Bureau of Military Statistics was established by the Legislature in 1863 to record the history of New York's volunteer Soldiers by collecting newspaper clippings, artifacts, and securing the battle flags of returning units. The Bureau published five reports summarizing the information collected and detailing the contributions made by New Yorkers during the Civil War. These records are also in searchable PDF format.

Direct to Roster of New York Volunteers During the Civil War

From the New York State Military History Museum and Veterans Research Center:
+ Additional Resources by Conflict

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

12 Ways Libraries Are Good for the Country

By Leonard Kniffel
A gift from American Libraries magazine of one dozen ideals toward which libraries strive.

Americans love their libraries, and advances in technology have multiplied the ways in which libraries enrich the quality of life in their communities. Whether they are in an elementary school or a university, a museum or a corporation, public or private, our nation's libraries offer a lifetime of learning. To library supporters everywhere - Friends, trustees, board members, patrons, and volunteers - American Libraries magazine offers this gift of 12 ideals toward which librarians strive as they provide comprehensive access to the record of human existence.

1. Libraries sustain democracy.

2. Libraries break down boundaries.

3. Libraries level the playing field.

4. Libraries value the individual.

MORE HERE.

Monday, December 27, 2010

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

FCC Passes Net Neutrality Rules

The American Library Association (ALA), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and EDUCAUSE said in a joint statement that the new order "does not go far enough to ensure community anchor institutions' content and services can be equally accessed by the public."

The groups last week voiced significant reservations to the FCC about the new rules as they would relate to the use of paid prioritization, the definition of the word "consumer," the distinction between wireline and wireless networks, and the need for a judicial determination of what constitutes unlawful content.

The FCC did clarify "consumer" to leave no doubt that the rules will apply to libraries and other educational interests, but the measure still falls short of true net neutrality, the groups said.

"The order does not hold wireless to the same non-discriminatory standards as wireline access, despite the growing number of libraries, higher education institutions, and users that utilize wireless technology to access content and information," the groups said.

The complete article may be read HERE.

Also of interest:
Net Neutrality Advocates Decry FCC 'False' Solution and 'Squandered Opportunity' from Common Dreams
The FCC's weak new "open Internet" rules from Salon

Friday, December 17, 2010

A Festival of Nine Lessons & Carols


THE CATHEDRAL CHOIR OF MEN AND BOYS
Woodrow Bynum, Music Director

2:30 p.m. Program of seasonal music presented by Lloyd Cast Organ Fellow, Graham Schultz and one of the areas top brass ensembles, Dominant Five.
3:00 p.m. Lessons and Carols

Choral works by Skellern, Ord, Willcocks, Darke, Preston, Howells, Hadley, Wood and James Bassi.

A reception follows in Pedersen Hall.

The Cathedral of All Saints
62 South Swan Street
Albany, NY 12210
518-465-1342

The Cathedral is handicapped accessible.

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Oldest Librarian edition

In 2005, an article was written about a 99-year-old librarian named Martha Smith who has been working at the Coal Creek library in Vinland, Kansas USA since 1926. In 2008, a follow-up article was penned about Smith, then 102 and still working at the library, which functions more as a museum now than a public library.

A librarian recently asked the reporter who wrote the 2008 article how Smith is doing and here is what he said: "Martha Smith is still alive at 105! From what I could glean she still goes to the library most days, although mostly just to sleep. She is still mobile, but has lost most of her hearing and her sight. Understandably communication is difficult."

Thanks to Help A Librarian.

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

New York State Archives Expands Digital Collection

The New York State Archives has been posting digitized primary documents on its website for a number of years, for use by researchers, teachers, students and the interested public. Recently, the Archives has begun to place audio collections online, adding to the images and videos already available on their website. The material includes records from the Archives’ collection as well as instructional recordings from workshops and conferences.

Recordings currently on the website include Gov. Rockefeller’s first State of the State address in January 1959, Dr. Harlan Hoyt Horner’s interview in 1961 about the 1911 Capitol fire, and the opening of the NYS Senate debate on adding an equal rights amendment to the NYS Constitution in 1975. All audio files include a transcript.

Primary audio and video sources are important documentary evidence of 20th and 21st century New York history. The Images and Video section was added to the State Archives’ homepage in October 2009 as videos were being placed on the Archives’ YouTube channel.

The Archives plans a monthly release of either video or audio materials to their website, including materials from the first Cuomo administration. To explore the collection, please visit HERE.

(excerpted from VOCE, The Voice of Cultural Education, December 3, 2010)

Monday, December 13, 2010

Liber8


Liber8 is "An economic information portal for librarians and students" provided by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. It includes links to the International Economic Statistics (IES) Database, plus economic data and research articles. The "browse by subject" function is most useful.

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

A Suitable Quotation

The only true equalisers in the world are books; the only treasure-house open to all comers is a library; the only wealth which will not decay is knowledge; the only jewel which you can carry beyond the grave is wisdom.
-- J. A. Langford

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Local Authors Discuss/Sell/Sign Their Books

APL has two events coming up where local authors will read from their work and sign books. The featured books will also be available to purchase at these events. D. Alexander Holiday will read from his book, "In the Care of Strangers: The Autobiography of a Foster Child" on Wednesday, Dec. 8, at 6 p.m. at the Delaware Branch (331 Delaware Avenue). Holiday was born in New York City and raised in foster care. He later earned bachelor's and master's degrees from the University at Albany. Times Union writer Paul Grondahl will read from "The Story of Albany" on Tuesday, Dec. 14, at 1:30 p.m. at the Main Library. The book features a number of Albany remembrances penned by Albany residents, workers, and supporters. Paul will read from the book, which was produced by the Times Union last year and sponsored by APL.

Happy Anniversary Pine Hills Branch

The Times Union wrote that the numbers tell the story of the success of the Pine Hills branch of the Albany Public Library. well, perhaps in part. But I don't know how one quantifies how wonderful that space has turned out to be. Here's the library's take.

Monday, December 06, 2010

Everett Road blood donation center

Effective December 1st, the Everett Road blood donation center has expanded its hours, now open later on Mondays and also open on Thursdays to better meet donor needs.
Monday: 6:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday: 6:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Thursday: 12:00 p.m - 7:00 p.m.
Friday: 6:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Saturday: 6:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Sunday: 6:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Donation appointments are required.

To schedule an appointment to donate at blood at the Everett Road donation center or to find out about other donation opportunities in our community, please call 1-800-RED CROSS (800-733-2767) or go to redcrossblood.org.

All presenting donors who donate in December can enter to win one of four Home Theater entertainment packages donated by Best Buy!

Friday, December 03, 2010

Huge Book/Music/Movie Sale Dec. 4

Bargain hunters looking for gently used books, movies, and music at very low prices should head to the Main Library on Saturday, Dec. 4. The Bookends Used Book Store clearance sale will take place from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. in the small auditorium of the Main Library at 161 Washington Avenue. Admission is free from 11 a.m. until close. Early admission is $5 from 10 to 11 a.m. For more information, please call 427-4349.

Thousands of items will be on sale:
· DVDs are $3 each
· Antique books are $2 each
· Oversized and hard cover books are $1 each
· Soft cover books and music CDs are two for $1
· Pocket books are four for $1
· VHS tapes and LPs are 5 for $1

Bring your own bag for the special bag sale that runs from 2 to 5 p.m. Fill your bag with as many items as it will hold for just $5. Oversized bags will be charged accordingly.

A small quantity of used computer monitors will also be for sale. The 15-inch, LCD, flat-screen monitors will be sold for $25 each, as is. The library will provide no technical support, and will accept no returns.

Thursday, December 02, 2010

Information Overload in the 16th Century

Here's an interesting article on information overload from Ann Blair, professor of history at Harvard University. Apparently, information overload was also a worry as a result of Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press. The evolution of the card catalog is also explained.

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

World AIDS Day

An estimated 1.1 million Americans are living with HIV, and yet one out of five don’t know it. World AIDS Day (December 1) is an opportunity to take action.

Monday, November 29, 2010

OTC meds will need Rx for Health Flex Spending


I believe there are some really good aspects of the new health care bill. This is not one of them: Over-the-counter medications will require a prescription to buy them with flexible spending account funds next year under new health care reform regulations. "The health care reform law sharply restricts FSA reimbursements for OTC purchases such as nonprescription pain relievers, cold medicines, antacids and allergy medications." Insulin is specifically excluded from this ruling.

Specifically, "the IRS says OTC reimbursements require a prescription, which it defines as a 'written or electronic order for a medicine or drug that meets the legal requirements of a prescription in the state in which a medical expense is incurred and that is issued by an individual who is legally authorized to issue a prescription in that state,'" whatever THAT means.

Thursday, November 25, 2010

Thanksgiving


Thanksgiving: thanks to the Census Bureau.

The "event became a national holiday in 1863 when President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday of November as a national day of thanksgiving. Later, President Franklin Roosevelt clarified that Thanksgiving should always be celebrated on the fourth Thursday of the month to encourage earlier holiday shopping, never on the occasional fifth Thursday."

We are thankful that FDR provided that extra shopping period. Otherwise, Thanksgiving would have been a week later in 2000, 2006 and 2007, and would be a week later in 2012, 2017, 2018, 2023, 2028, 2029...

Seriously, I am thankful for all sorts of good things.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Friends Book Review

Nov. 30, Tuesday, 12:15 p.m.—Book Review
Jonathan Franzen’s “Freedom: A Novel” will be reviewed by Dave Kibbe, M.B.A., a former information technology professional.

Remember

Library branches will be closed today by 5:30, closed Thursday and Friday, but open Saturday.

Also, Friends meeting 5 pm Monday on the 2nd floor of the main branch.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Allen Ballard

I was so impressed with author Allen Ballard, who spoke at a Friends event on Saturday, November 13. HERE are my thoughts.

Friday, November 19, 2010

Special chart for Western European characters

Special characters on Windows (PC keyboards)
On Windows, the Alt key functions as a modifier like the Shift key. To make special characters, hold down the Alt key and type in the numbers from the numeric keypad. Note that on the some small keyboards (e.g. laptop keybaords) the “numeric keypad” is found by pressing the NumLock key and then looking for the keys on your keyboard that double as numeric keypad keys when in NumLock mode.

Glyph Windows Description
‘ Alt+0145 left single quote
’ Alt+0146 right single quote
“ Alt+0147 left double quote
” Alt+0148 right double quote
† Alt+0134 dagger
‡ Alt+0135 double dagger
‰ Alt+0137 per mill sign
‹ Alt+0139 single left-pointing angle quote
› Alt+0155 single right-pointing angle quote
™ Alt+0153 trademark sign
– Alt+0150 en dash
— Alt+0151 em dash
Alt+0160 nonbreaking space
¡ Alt+0161 inverted exclamation
¢ Alt+0162 cent sign
£ Alt+0163 pound sterling
¤ Alt+0164 general currency sign
¥ Alt+0165 yen sign
¦ Alt+0166 broken vertical bar
§ Alt+0167 section sign
¨ Alt+0168 umlaut
© Alt+0169 copyright
ª Alt+0170 feminine ordinal
« Alt+0171 left angle quote
¬ Alt+0172 not sign
­ Alt+0173 soft hyphen
® Alt+0174 registered trademark
¯ Alt+0175 macron accent
° Alt+0176 degree sign
± Alt+0177 plus or minus
² Alt+0178 superscript two
³ Alt+0179 superscript three
´ Alt+0180 acute accent
µ Alt+0181 micro sign
¶ Alt+0182 paragraph sign
· Alt+0183 middle dot
¸ Alt+0184 cedilla
¹ Alt+0185 superscript one
º Alt+0186 masculine ordinal
» Alt+0187 right angle quote
¼ Alt+0188 one-fourth
½ Alt+0189 one-half
¾ Alt+0190 three-fourths
¿ Alt+0191 inverted question mark
À Alt+0192 uppercase A, grave accent
Á Alt+0193 uppercase A, acute accent
 Alt+0194 uppercase A, circumflex accent
à Alt+0195 uppercase A, tilde
Ä Alt+0196 uppercase A, umlaut
Å Alt+0197 uppercase A, ring
Æ Alt+0198 uppercase AE
Ç Alt+0199 uppercase C, cedilla
È Alt+0200 uppercase E, grave accent
É Alt+0201 uppercase E, acute accent
Ê Alt+0202 uppercase E, circumflex accent
Ë Alt+0203 uppercase E, umlaut
Ì Alt+0204 uppercase I, grave accent
Í Alt+0205 uppercase I, acute accent
Î Alt+0206 uppercase I, circumflex accent
Ï Alt+0207 uppercase I, umlaut
Ð Alt+0208 uppercase Eth, Icelandic
Ñ Alt+0209 uppercase N, tilde
Ò Alt+0210 uppercase O, grave accent
Ó Alt+0211 uppercase O, acute accent
Ô Alt+0212 uppercase O, circumflex accent
Õ Alt+0213 uppercase O, tilde
Ö Alt+0214 uppercase O, umlaut
× Alt+0215 multiplication sign
Ø Alt+0216 uppercase O, slash
Ù Alt+0217 uppercase U, grave accent
Ú Alt+0218 uppercase U, acute accent
Û Alt+0219 uppercase U, circumflex accent
Ü Alt+0220 uppercase U, umlaut
Ý Alt+0221 uppercase Y, acute accent
Þ Alt+0222 uppercase THORN, Icelandic
ß Alt+0223 lowercase sharps, German
à Alt+0224 lowercase a, grave accent
á Alt+0225 lowercase a, acute accent
â Alt+0226 lowercase a, circumflex accent
ã Alt+0227 lowercase a, tilde
ä Alt+0228 lowercase a, umlaut
å Alt+0229 lowercase a, ring
æ Alt+0230 lowercase ae
ç Alt+0231 lowercase c, cedilla
è Alt+0232 lowercase e, grave accent
é Alt+0233 lowercase e, acute accent
ê Alt+0234 lowercase e, circumflex accent
ë Alt+0235 lowercase e, umlaut
ì Alt+0236 lowercase i, grave accent
í Alt+0237 lowercase i, acute accent
î Alt+0238 lowercase i, circumflex accent
ï Alt+0239 lowercase i, umlaut
ð Alt+0240 lowercase eth, Icelandic
ñ Alt+0241 lowercase n, tilde
ò Alt+0242 lowercase o, grave accent
ó Alt+0243 lowercase o, acute accent
ô Alt+0244 lowercase o, circumflex accent
õ Alt+0245 lowercase o, tilde
ö Alt+0246 lowercase o, umlaut
÷ Alt+0247 division sign
ø Alt+0248 lowercase o, slash
ù Alt+0249 lowercase u, grave accent
ú Alt+0250 lowercase u, acute accent
û Alt+0251 lowercase u, circumflex accent
ü Alt+0252 lowercase u, umlaut
ý Alt+0253 lowercase y, acute accent
þ Alt+0254 lowercase thorn, Icelandic
ÿ Alt+0255 lowercase y, umlaut

More info, including for Mac users, HERE.

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Profile of the Pine Hills Branch

Wade Abbott, a College of St. Rose journalism student, produced this story for the Times Union’s Pine Hills neighborhood blog.

Friends Speaker series - Nov 23

Nov. 23, Tuesday, 12:15 p.m.—Speaker
“Immigration” will be the topic of a discussion hosted by Melanie Trimble, executive director of the Capital Region Chapter of the NY Civil Liberties Union and former president of the Albany County League of Women Voters.

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

A Letter to Andrew Carnegie from Ted Sorensen


Theodore C. Sorensen [May 8, 1928 – October 31, 2010], former Special Counsel and Adviser to President John F. Kennedy and a widely published author on the presidency and foreign affairs... - letter from c 2008:

Dear Mr. Carnegie:

Your life and work had enormous influence on mine. You may think that most unlikely, inasmuch as you died in 1919, having reached the peak of your influence and fame in the late 19th century, and I was not born until 1928 in the state of Nebraska, far from the eastern regions of this country where you made your fame and fortune...

As a boy, I spent most Saturdays at the Carnegie Library in my hometown of Lincoln, Nebraska, as did my four siblings. We borrowed every book we could, initially for our reading pleasure, later for research as members of the Lincoln High School debate teams on which all five Sorensen children participated over time, and from which we acquired a substantial portion of the writing, reading and research skills that we all used in our subsequent careers. The main library in Lincoln was built in 1899 with your grant of $87,000, one of the largest of nearly 70 Carnegie library grants scattered throughout the towns and villages of Nebraska.

Like my former boss and mentor, President John F. Kennedy, I have long believed that libraries at every level— community and university and national—have been among the most important institutions of education in our country, as they have since the dawn of civilization in others. They provide literature and learning to all who seek them. Countless Americans gained access to the great books of the world only through the hundreds of excellent libraries that dot this country, thanks to your recognizing both their importance and their inevitably high cost. It is because of you that so many of us have received those benefits—and the benefits of major museums, colleges and other institutions of learning, and we still do. (Those other great institutions of learning include, of course, Carnegie-Mellon University.)

Complete letter HERE.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Eat Out for a Good Cause

FOCUS and HATAS (Homeless and Travelers Aid Society) have partnered together with restaurants around the Capital District to bring you Restaurant Nights in support of Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week! Dine out at these participating restaurants Tonight, November 16 and Tomorrow, November 17th, and a portion of your bill will go to help FOCUS and HATAS fight hunger and homelessness. For more information, visit FOCUS and HATAS on the web!

Monday, November 15, 2010

APL Closed Thanksgiving and "Black Friday"

All APL locations will close by 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 24, 2010.

All APL locations will be closed Thursday & Friday, November 25-26, 2010 for Thanksgiving, but will be open on Saturday, November 27.

Saturday, November 13, 2010

Collection Update from NewYorkHeritage.org

New York Heritage Digital Collections has recently added several new collections to its cooperative site at NewYorkHeritage.org , including the Buffalo Postcards Collection housed at the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society, the Polster Photographs of Lockport Collection housed at the Lockport Public Library, 1896-1910 Rensselaer County Fair materials from the Nassau Free Library, and the Murder Pamphlet Collection Exhibit from the Research Library, New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown, NY.

NewYorkHeritage.org is a project of the NY 3Rs Association, which uses OCLC’s CONTENTdm Multisite Server to bring regionally digitized collections together, allowing researchers to search across all items simultaneously. This project provides free, online access to images of cultural and historical significance in New York State.

Participants in New York Heritage Digital Collections are committed to enhancing the site by adding both content and contributing institutions on a regular basis. The goal of the project is to eventually connect one thousand collections and one million items from throughout New York State. All institutions interested in participating in the project through their local reference and research library resources councils are encouraged to complete this online form.

The New York 3Rs Association is a partnership among New York’s nine reference and research resource systems. The New York 3Rs was incorporated in 2003 to further the ability of those systems to provide statewide services. The members of the New York 3Rs Association are: the Capital District Library Council, Central New York Library Resources Council, Long Island Library Resources Council, Metropolitan New York Library Council, Northern New York Library Network, Rochester Regional Library Council, Southeastern New York Library Resources Council, South Central Regional Library Council, and Western New York Library Resources Council.

Friday, November 12, 2010

New York state warns of drowsy driving

By TIM O'BRIEN, Times Union Staff Writer

ALBANY -- It's been a long drive, and you're almost home. You grab a cup of coffee to keep going, roll down the window to let the cold air blast you in the face, and crank up the radio. Still, you can't seem to stop yawning. Your eyes fight to stay open. The last thing you remember is seeing your car start to drift.

Every year, 1,000 car crashes in New York state are caused by drowsy drivers. Another 3,000 accidents involve drivers who fell asleep at the wheel, said state Department of Motor Vehicles Commissioner David J. Swarts.

According the Swarts, all the aforementioned tactics tired drivers try to use to make themselves more alert are "not effective."

"The best thing to do is pull over someplace safe and take a nap," he said...

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Facts for Features: Veterans Day 2010: Nov. 11

Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938. President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation in 1954 to change the name to Veterans Day as a way to honor those who served in all American wars. The day honors living military veterans with parades and speeches across the nation. A national ceremony takes place at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

Friends Speaker Series

Nov. 16, Tuesday, 12:15 p.m.—Speaker
“Stephen Foster & Co.: Lyrics of America’s First Great Popular Songs” will be reviewed by Richard King, attorney of counsel with Reed and Laniado, LLP.

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Mendelssohn at First Presbyterian Church

From an article by Michael Lister, First Presbyterian Church

On Sunday, November 14 at 4 pm, the Chancel Choir of First Presbyterian Church will partner with the choir of Troy First United Presbyterian Church, under the direction of Maury Castro, to perform the magnificent cantata Lauda Sion, as well as other works by Felix Mendelssohn. In addition to the combined choirs, the concerts will feature members of the Hyperion String Quartet, soloists from FPC and FPC's esteemed organist, Nancy Frank. The first performance was in Troy on November 7.

For nearly 200 years, the music of Felix Mendelssohn has been a source of great inspiration, musically, socially, and spiritually. Hailing from a respected Jewish family that converted to Christianity when he was a child, Mendelssohn incorporated a strong sense of faith, tradition, and community in his music. Raised in a home that encouraged independent thought, artistic expression, and appreciation of culture, Mendelssohn incorporated all of these things into his work.

In addition to his own works, Mendelssohn is also credited with bringing about a renewed interest in music from previous generations, including the music of J.S. Bach, who had largely been forgotten before Mendelssohn’s time. Mendelssohn was also deeply committed to the development of a society that incorporated “receptivity to tradition; faith in God; tolerance; and a sense of community.” Many of his works demonstrate that philosophy. One of his later works was the cantata Lauda Sion, written for soloists, chorus, and orchestra, which incorporated much of his comprehensive philosophy. The large text speaks to the community of believers as they partake in communion together, which directs their attention to the glory and mercy of their Savior and incorporates the lineage of saints who have shared in the Sacred Banquet. Mendelssohn’s music beautifully depicts all of these ideas through a beautiful tapestry of sound woven together in his unique and reverent style.

Finkelstein on Israeli-Palestinian Peace November 17-UAlbany

Norman Finkelstein will visit Lecture Center #18 at the UAlbany campus on Wednesday, November 17th at 8 PM to discuss Israel/Palestine After Gaza/Flotilla Attack.

Sponsored by the Palestinian Rights Committee, Amnesty International and the Justice and Peace in Palestine Alliance (JAPPA)

Finkelstein is an academic scholar and internationally known commentator banned from speaking in Israel and the occupied territories and subject of the documentary "American Radical."

His talk is free and open to the public. Contact Gene Damm at gdamm@nycap.rr.com or 518-482-7675.

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

New York State Poet Laureate Jean Valentine

There will be a poetry reading on Tuesday, Nov. 16, by New York State Poet Laureate Jean Valentine. She will read from her work starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Main Library. This event is free and open to the public, and is cosponsored by the NYS Writers Institute.

Friends Book review

Nov. 9, Tuesday, 12:15 p.m.—Book Review
Atul Gawande’s “The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right” will be reviewed by Michael Gordon, M.D.

Monday, November 08, 2010

A Well-Stocked National Digital Library System?

Why We Can't Afford Not to Create a Well-Stocked National Digital Library System
The Atlantic
by David Rothman, a writer in Alexandria, Va, the founder of TeleRead, the oldest English-language site offering general e-book news and views.


E-book gadgets have finally cracked the mass market here in the United States or at least have come a long way.

Consider a memorable Kindle commercial from Amazon, in which a brunette in a bikini one-ups an oafish man reading off a rival machine. Mr. Beer Belly asks about her e-reader. "It's a Kindle," she says by the pool. "$139. I actually paid more for these sunglasses." Mad Men would be proud. A year or two from now, count on twice as much ballyhoo and on better machines for less than $99.

I myself own both a Kindle 3 and the Brand X iPad and can attest to the improved readability of the latest E Ink from Amazon's supplier, even indoors, despite lack of built-in illumination. Outside on walks, as with earlier Kindles, I can listen to books from publishing houses savvy enough to allow text to speech. No matter where I am, I can instantly see all occurrences of a character's name in an engrossing Louis Bayard novel. I can also track down the meanings of archaic words that Bayard's detective narrator uses in this murder mystery set at West Point and featuring a
fictionalized Edgar Allan Poe.

But there is one thing I currently cannot do with my Kindle despite all the sizzle in the commercials--read public library books. Local libraries do not use the Kindle format for their electronic collections, relying instead on rival standards used by Sony Readers and certain other devices. Amazon undoubtedly would love to fix this under terms favorable to CEO Jeff Bezos and friends. But then other issues will remain. How many Kindle books--or those readable on Sony Readers, iPads, and others--will cash-strapped libraries in poorer cities be able to lend? What range of
titles will be available? And shouldn't we look beyond books and consider the needs of researchers who, for example, could benefit from reliably preserved electronic discussions linked to individual books.

Might the time have finally come for a well-stocked national digital library system (NDLS) for the United States--a cause I've publicly advocated since 1992 in Computerworld, a 1996 MIT Press information science collection, the Washington Post, U.S. News & World Report, the Huffington Post, and elsewhere, including my national information stimulus plan here in the Fallows blog?

Author of Year Lecture by Allen Ballard

Capital Region author Allen B. Ballard, Ph.D., will be honored by the Friends group on Saturday, Nov. 13, at 1:30 p.m. at the Main Library. The Friends will present Ballard, a professor of history and Africana studies at the University at Albany, with the 2010 Author of the Year Award. Ballard will also give a lecture. His most recent novel, “Carried by Six,” received the 2010 Honor Book Prize in Afro-American literature from the American Library Association’s Black Caucus. This event is free and open to the public.

Sunday, November 07, 2010

Anger as a Private Company Takes Over Libraries

From the 9/27/2010 New York Times.

A private company in Maryland has taken over public libraries in ailing cities in California, Oregon, Tennessee and Texas, growing into the country’s fifth-largest library system.

Friday, November 05, 2010

"Freedom's Treasures" Exhibit to Be in State Capitol

The "Freedom's Treasures" exhibit, a rare display of Revolutionary War-era and early nation period historical artifacts, including a handwritten draft of Washington's Farewell Address, will be open to the public at the State Capitol's ceremonial Red Room, from 10 AM to 4 PM on November 10-11.

"Our nation's founding fathers and countless dedicated patriots put their lives on the line in support of the ideals of freedom and liberty," Governor David Paterson said. "This important exhibition of rare and historic artifacts from America's struggle for freedom will inspire us all to remember and cherish our past, as New Yorkers and Americans. Veterans Day, on which we honor those who have protected and defended our nation, is a particularly auspicious time for us to reflect on the history of the United States through this remarkable collection."

The exhibition, entitled "Freedom's Treasures," features a collection from the New York State Library, Archives and Museum of some of New York's most important Revolutionary Era artifacts that have rarely been seen by the public. Featured in the exhibition is an original draft of George Washington's Farewell Address penned in his hand that was sent to Alexander Hamilton for comment and revision on May 15, 1796. The document is part of the George Washington Collection at the New York State Library and was rescued from the fire that ravaged the State Capitol in 1911.

"Freedom's Treasures" also will give the public the chance to see a dress sword allegedly given to General Washington by Frederick the Great. The sword was purchased by the State of New York directly from Washington's family in 1871 and is depicted in the Washington portrait that hangs in the United States House of Representatives. According to Washington family tradition, the sword was given to General Washington with this verbal message from Frederick (the Great) II, King of Prussia: "From the oldest general of the world to the greatest."

Among the other artifacts included in this exhibition are a portrait of New York State's sixth Governor DeWitt Clinton and a writing desk he used. In office during two non-consecutive terms, Clinton was responsible for the building of the Erie Canal. The exhibit also includes the original engrossed copy of the U.S. Constitution sent to New York State for ratification and the "spy papers" retrieved from British Major John Andre's boot that implicated American General Benedict Arnold in the West Point conspiracy.

The full list of exhibited items is as follows:

● Washington's Farewell Address;

● Bronze bust of George Washington;

● Leaves from Washington's copy of "A Representation of the Cloathing of His Majesty's Household and of all the Forces upon the Establishments of Great Britain and Ireland" (the uniform book);

● Washington's dress sword;

● Benedict Arnold / John Andre papers;

● A print of John Andre crossing the Hudson River (based upon his own drawing of the event);

● Engrossed copy of the original U.S. Constitution;

● DeWitt Clinton portrait; and

● DeWitt Clinton's writing desk and chair.

Reservations are required for those interested in visiting the Freedom's Treasures exhibit on Wednesday, November 10. On Wednesday, those who are registered for the tour should meet at the Plaza Visitor Center, North Concourse, Empire State Plaza, Albany. For those interested in making reservations for Wednesday, November 10, please visit the OGS website.

Reservations are NOT required on Thursday, November 11. Those interested in viewing the exhibit should enter the Capitol directly and follow the signs that will be posted. Visitors can gain access to the Capitol either from State Street or through the Empire Plaza Concourse.

For directions to the Empire State Plaza please visit HERE.

For parking instructions at the Empire State Plaza please visit HERE.

Thursday, November 04, 2010

To Kill a Saturday

A reading of To Kill a Mockingbird, Saturday, November 6 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m at the BOOK HOUSE in Stuyvesant Plaza, to benefit Literacy Volunteers. I'm scheduled to read at 3 p.m. Read more here.

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

All APL locations closed Thursday, November 4th

...for Staff Development Day. Library will reopen Friday, November 5.

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

Monday, November 01, 2010

Alluring Androids and Robots in Film, Photography, and Art

The idea of artificial women who seem alive has long fascinated artists, photographers, filmmakers, and videogame designers. Today's female robots look so real they can easily fool the eye. These images reveal our social attitudes about women and also the impact of robots on our lives. This illustrated presentation raises provocative new questions: Do men and women view female robots differently? How do these images reveal men’s fantasies and fears about women? Will these ultra-realistic robots enhance our lives or challenge our humanity?

Professor Julie Wosk, State University of New York, Maritime College, will present this program which will be held in the Librarians Room on the 7th floor of the NYS Library. This program, which is free and open to the public, is made possible through the support of the NY Council for the Humanities’ Speakers in the Humanities program.

Friday, November 5th, 12:15 – 1:15 p.m.
You are welcome to bring your lunch.


TO REGISTER online go to this site or e-mail NYSLTRN@mail.nysed.gov or or call 518-474-2274. Please let the library know if any reasonable accommodation is required (Americans with Disabilities Act) at least three business days prior to the program date.

New York State Library/Reference Services, Cultural Education Center, Albany, NY 12230 (518-474-5355).

VOTE TOMORROW

Go HERE for all the info, including WHERE TO VOTE.

CANDIDATES FOR ELECTION - NOVEMBER 2, 2010

OFFICE
PARTY
CANDIDATE
ADDRESS

GOVERNOR

DEM
ANDREW M. CUOMO
4 BITTERSWEET LANE, MOUNT KISCO, NY 10549
REP
CARL P. PALADINO
282 POTTERS ROAD, BUFFALO, NY 14220
IND
ANDREW M. CUOMO
4 BITTERSWEET LANE, MOUNT KISCO, NY 10549
CON
CARL P. PALADINO
282 POTTERS ROAD, BUFFALO, NY 14220
WOR
ANDREW M. CUOMO
4 BITTERSWEET LANE, MOUNT KISCO, NY 10549
GRN
HOWIE HAWKINS
P.O. BOX 562, SYRACUSE, NY 13205
RDH
JIMMY MCMILLAN
1996 NOSTRAND AVENUE, BROOKLYN, NY 11210
LBT
WARREN REDLICH
6946 SUZANNE COURT, SCHENECTADY, NY 12303
APP
KRISTIN M. DAVIS
232 E. 74TH STREET, APT 4D, NEW YORK, NY 10021
FDM
CHARLES BARRON
744 BRADFORD STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11207
TXP
CARL P. PALADINO
282 POTTERS ROAD, BUFFALO, NY 14220

LT. GOVERNOR

DEM
ROBERT J. DUFFY
164 CROYDON ROAD, ROCHESTER, NY 14610
REP
GREGORY J. EDWARDS
2714 GARFIELD ROAD, JAMESTOWN, NY 14701
IND
ROBERT J. DUFFY
164 CROYDON ROAD, ROCHESTER, NY 14610
CON
GREGORY J. EDWARDS
2714 GARFIELD ROAD, JAMESTOWN, NY 14701
WOR
ROBERT J. DUFFY
164 CROYDON ROAD, ROCHESTER, NY 14610
GRN
GLORIA MATTERA
437 SECOND STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11215
LBT
ALDEN LINK
36 GREENTREE LANE, MILTON, NY 12547
APP
TANYA GENDELMAN
3152 BRIGHTON 6TH STREET, APT 301, BROOKLYN, NY 11235
FDM
EVA M. DOYLE
425 EMSLIE STREET, BUFFALO, NY 14212
TXP
GREGORY J. EDWARDS
2714 GARFIELD ROAD, JAMESTOWN, NY 14701

COMPTROLLER

DEM
THOMAS P. DINAPOLI
100 GREAT NECK ROAD, GREAT NECK, NY 11021
REP
HARRY WILSON
42 SAGE TERRACE, SCARSDALE, NY 10583
IND
HARRY WILSON
42 SAGE TERRACE, SCARSDALE, NY 10583
CON
HARRY WILSON
42 SAGE TERRACE, SCARSDALE, NY 10583
WOR
THOMAS P. DINAPOLI
100 GREAT NECK ROAD, GREAT NECK, NY 11021
GRN
JULIA A. WILLEBRAND
255 WEST 84TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10024
LBT
JOHN GAETANI
49 CEDAR LANE, GLENVILLE, NY 12302

ATTORNEY GENERAL

DEM
ERIC T. SCHNEIDERMAN
645 WEST END AVENUE, APT 8F, NEW YORK, NY 10025
REP
DAN DONOVAN
31 HYLAN BOULEVARD, STATEN ISLAND, NY 10305
IND
ERIC T. SCHNEIDERMAN
645 WEST END AVENUE, APT 8F, NEW YORK, NY 10025
CON
DAN DONOVAN
31 HYLAN BOULEVARD, STATEN ISLAND, NY 10305
WOR
ERIC T. SCHNEIDERMAN
645 WEST END AVENUE, APT 8F, NEW YORK, NY 10025
LBT
CARL E. PERSON
330 WEST 55TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10019
FRM
RAMON J. JIMENEZ
2922 BRUCKNER BOULEVARD, 2ND FLR, BRONX, NY 10465

U.S. SENATOR (2 YR UNEXPIRED TERM)

DEM
KIRSTEN E. GILLIBRAND
358 MT. MERINO ROAD, HUDSON, NY 12534
REP
JOSEPH J. DIOGUARDI
1607 EAGLE BAY DRIVE, OSSINING, NY 10562
IND
KIRSTEN E. GILLIBRAND
358 MT. MERINO ROAD, HUDSON, NY 12534
CON
JOSEPH J. DIOGUARDI
1607 EAGLE BAY DRIVE, OSSINING, NY 10562
WOR
KIRSTEN E. GILLIBRAND
358 MT. MERINO ROAD, HUDSON, NY 12534
GRN
CECILE A. LAWRENCE
14 ALPINE DRIVE, APALACHIN, NY 13732
RDH
JOSEPH HUFF
275 MENNELLA ROAD, POUGHQUAG, NY 12570
LBT
JOHN CLIFTON
168-32 127TH AVENUE, APT 9D, JAMAICA, NY 11434
APP
VIVIA MORGAN
636 BROOKLYN AVENUE, APT 2D, BROOKLYN, NY 11203
TXP
JOSEPH J. DIOGUARDI
1607 EAGLE BAY DRIVE, OSSINING, NY 10562
TRP
BRUCE BLAKEMAN
200 EAST 69TH STREET, APT 11D, NEW YORK, NY 10021

U.S. SENATOR (6 YR FULL TERM)

DEM
CHARLES E. SCHUMER
9 PROSPECT PARK WEST, BROOKLYN, NY 11215
REP
JAY TOWNSEND
P.O. BOX 524, CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON, NY 12520
IND
CHARLES E. SCHUMER
9 PROSPECT PARK WEST, BROOKLYN, NY 11215
CON
JAY TOWNSEND
P.O. BOX 524, CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON, NY 12520
WOR
CHARLES E. SCHUMER
9 PROSPECT PARK WEST, BROOKLYN, NY 11215
GRN
COLIA CLARK
52 ST. NICHOLAS PLACE, NEW YORK, NY 10001
LBT
RANDY A. CREDICO
14 SEVENTH AVENUE, BROOKLYN, NY 11217
APP
RANDY A. CREDICO
14 SEVENTH AVENUE, BROOKLYN, NY 11217

REP. IN CONGRESS (21ST DISTRICT)

DEM
PAUL D. TONKO
137 PRINCETON STREET, AMSTERDAM, NY 12010
REP
THEODORE J. DANZ, JR.
5907 GARDNER ROAD, ALTAMONT, NY 12009
IND
PAUL D. TONKO
137 PRINCETON STREET, AMSTERDAM, NY 12010
CON
THEODORE J. DANZ, JR.
5907 GARDNER ROAD, ALTAMONT, NY 12009
WOR
PAUL D. TONKO
137 PRINCETON STREET, AMSTERDAM, NY 12010


STATE SENATOR (46TH DISTRICT)

DEM
NEIL D. BRESLIN
15 PINEDALE AVENUE, DELMAR, NY 12054
REP
BOB DOMENICI
38 AUSABLE FORKS, ALBANY, NY 12205
IND
NEIL D. BRESLIN
15 PINEDALE AVENUE, DELMAR, NY 12054
CON
BOB DOMENICI
38 AUSABLE FORKS, ALBANY, NY 12205
WOR
NEIL D. BRESLIN
15 PINEDALE AVENUE, DELMAR, NY 12054
RFM
MICHAEL J. CAREY
31 OAKWOOD ROAD, GLENMONT, NY 12077

MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY (104TH DISTRICT)

DEM
JOHN J. MCENENY
147 COLONIAL AVENUE, ALBANY, NY 12208
REP
DEBORAH M. BUSCH
265 SIMONS ROAD, ALTAMONT, NY 12009
IND
JOHN J. MCENENY
147 COLONIAL AVENUE, ALBANY, NY 12008
CON
DEBORAH M. BUSCH
265 SIMONS ROAD, ALTAMONT, NY 12009
WOR
JOHN J. MCENENY
147 COLONIAL AVENUE, ALBANY, NY 12008
TXP
DEBORAH M. BUSCH
265 SIMONS ROAD, ALTAMONT, NY 12009

MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY (106TH DISTRICT)

DEM
RONALD J. CANESTRARI
16 ROOSEVELT BOULEVARD, COHOES, NY 12047
IND
RONALD J. CANESTRARI
16 ROOSEVELT BOULEVARD, COHOES, NY 12047
WOR
RONALD J. CANESTRARI
16 ROOSEVELT BOULEVARD, COHOES, NY 12047

MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY (108TH DISTRICT)

DEM
TIMOTHY P. GORDON
15 BELDALE ROAD, SLINGERLANDS, NY 12159
REP
STEVE MCLAUGHLIN
52 AVENUE A, MELROSE, NY 12121
IND
TIMOTHY P. GORDON
15 BELDALE ROAD, SLINGERLANDS, NY 12159
CON
STEVE MCLAUGHLIN
52 AVENUE A, MELROSE, NY 12121
WOR
TIMOTHY P. GORDON
15 BELDALE ROAD, SLINGERLANDS, NY 12159

MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY (109TH DISTRICT)

DEM
ROBERT P. REILLY
12 CARRIAGE HILL DRIVE, LATHAM, NY 12110
REP
JENNIFER A. WHALEN
498 LOUDON ROAD, LOUDONVILLE, NY 12211
IND
ROBERT P. REILLY
12 CARRIAGE HILL DRIVE, LATHAM, NY 12110
CON
JENNIFER A. WHALEN
498 LOUDON ROAD, LOUDONVILLE, NY 12211
WOR
ROBERT P. REILLY
12 CARRIAGE HILL DRIVE, LATHAM, NY 12110

SURROGATE COURT JUDGE

DEM
CATHRYN M. DOYLE
2 OLD ENGLISH ROAD, SLINGERLANDS, NY 12159
REP
MARGARET M. ADKINS
2 OVERLOOK DRIVE, VOORHEESVILLE, NY 12186
IND
CATHRYN M. DOYLE
2 OLD ENGLISH ROAD, SLINGERLANDS, NY 12159
CON
CATHRYN M. DOYLE
2 OLD ENGLISH ROAD, SLINGERLANDS, NY 12159
WOR
HELENA HEATH-ROLAND
78 GLENDALE AVENUE, ALBANY, NY 12208

CITY OF ALBANY
BOARD OF EDUCATION (VOTE FOR 3)

JAMES K. LEMBO
48 BROOKLINE AVENUE, ALBANY, NY 12203
WAYNE P. MORRIS
96 RIDGEWOOD TERRACE, ALBANY, NY 12203
EDITH LEET
951 MYRTLE AVENUE, ALBANY, NY 12203
BARRY D. WALSTON
30 BUCHANAN STREET, ALBANY, NY 12206
FELICIA GREEN
2 GLENWOOD STREET, ALBANY, NY 12208
ALEXANDRA JANE STREZNEWSKI
143 MANNING BOULEVARD, ALBANY, NY 12203

CITY OF WATERVLIET

COUNCILMAN

DEM
NICHOLAS W. FOGLIA
713 6TH STREET, WATERVLIET, NY 12189
IND
NICHOLAS W. FOGLIA
713 6TH STREET, WATERVLIET, NY 12189
CON
NICHOLAS W. FOGLIA
713 6TH STREET, WATERVLIET, NY 12189

CITY COURT JUDGE

DEM
THOMAS E. LAMB
700 MANOR PLACE, WATERVLIET, NY 12189
CON
THOMAS E. LAMB
700 MANOR PLACE, WATERVLIET, NY 12189

TOWN OF BERNE

TOWN JUSTICE

DEM
KENNETH R. BUNZEY
1713 HELDERBERG TRAIL, BERNE, NY 12023

TOWN OF BETHLEHEM

TOWN JUSTICE

DEM
RYAN T. DONOVAN
29 CARRIAGE ROAD, DELMAR, NY 12054
REP
RALPH F. AMBROSIO
63 ADAMS PLACE, DELMAR, NY 12054
IND
RYAN T. DONOVAN
29 CARRIAGE ROAD, DELMAR, NY 12054
CON
RYAN T. DONOVAN
29 CARRIAGE ROAD, DELMAR, NY 12054

TOWN OF GREEN ISLAND

VILLAGE TRUSTEES (VOTE FOR 3)

DEM
MICHAEL A. COCCA, SR.
10 WEST STREET, GREEN ISLAND, NY 12183
RICHARD R. JONES, JR.
135 HUDSON AVENUE, GREEN ISLAND, NY 12183
BARBARA J. BELOKOPITSKY
21 LAFAYETTE PARK, GREEN ISLAND, NY 12183

TOWN OF RENSSELAERVILLE

COUNCILPERSON

DEM
DALE DORNER
1444 COUNTY ROUTE 351, RENSSELAERVILLE, NY 12147
REP
ROBERT L. BOLTE
8 BOLTE LANE, RENSSELAERVILLE, NY 12147
IND
ROBERT L. BOLTE
8 BOLTE LANE, RENSSELAERVILLE, NY 12147
CON
ROBERT L. BOLTE
8 BOLTE LANE, RENSSELAERVILLE, NY 12147

TOWN JUSTICE

DEM
TIMOTHY C. MILLER
1441 COUNTY ROUTE 351, RENSSELAERVILLE, NY 12147
REP
MYRA C. DORMAN
304 ALBANY HILL ROAD, RENSSELAERVILLE, NY 12147
IND
TIMOTHY C. MILLER
1441 COUNTY ROUTE 351, RENSSELAERVILLE, NY 12147

Saturday, October 30, 2010

Support FOCUS by Dining out Nov. 16 & 17

Help support the FOCUS Interfaith Food Pantry and the Homeless and Travelers Aid Society by dining out Tuesday, November 16 or Wednesday, November 17th. Partnering restaurants will donate a certain percentage of proceeds from those two nights to help stop hunger and homelessness in our community. Restaurants that are committed include:

Dale Miller: The Art of Dining
Angelo’s 677 Prime
Franklin’s Tower
Bayou Café

This list is still in formation, check the website often for updates!

Friday, October 29, 2010

FOCUS on Food

The FOCUS Winter Breakfast begins its 27th season on Tuesday, November 2nd! Over 50 volunteers have signed up to cover early morning shifts Tuesday - Thursday through next April. Last season, the program served over 16,000 meals and averaged 140 guests per morning.

This week, FRAC (Food Research and Action Center) sponsored a virtual rally to support ending childhood hunger. FOCUS supports a strong federal nutrition bill that doesn’t cut funding for SNAP (food stamps). 1 in 6 children in NYS experience hunger or are at risk of hunger. Click here to learn more about how you can help reduce child hunger.

Thursday, October 28, 2010

NYC Zombie March to City Hall

Urban Librarians Unite
www.savenyclibraries.org
savenyclibraries@gmail.com

Save NYC Libraries Postcard Campaign and Urban Librarians Unite Announce Halloween Zombie Walk to Save NYC Public Libraries
October 31, 2010
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Urban Librarians Unite announce a Halloween Zombie Walk in support of New York City's public libraries, to be held October 31, 2010, beginning at Cadman Plaza, Brooklyn and continuing over the Brooklyn Bridge to commence at City Hall, New York, New York, USA.

The Halloween Zombie Walk brings library-loving New Yorkers together for a day of public theater to draw public attention to the mid-year budget cuts faced by New York City's public libraries. What does any of this have to do with zombies? Well, without libraries there are simply no brains, and zombies need to eat brains to live. With libraries across the city closed on weekends there is a desperate food shortage. So New York City’s zombie librarians will be walking across the Brooklyn Bridge to City Hall this Halloween to protest the drastic cuts to their food supply. These zombies are starving and without the support of the public library their future appears grim.

New York City's three library systems serve 8 million residents from a combined 212 locations, numbering over 43 million visits in FY'09. Since the economic crisis began, library use has been at an all-time high, with many New Yorkers depending on their local library for access to the information, resources, and programs necessary to conduct job searches, complete their education, navigate the Internet, and access public services.

Mayor Bloomberg’s projected mid-year budget adjustment will cut funding for libraries by $16.5 million - 5.4% across the board. This comes on the heels of a devastating August reduction of $30 million that decimated weekend library service. Three years of brutal cuts during the biggest economic crisis in a generation have reduced public library funding by a shocking $74.5 million since 2008, or 20%. Additional cuts will result in further service reductions and layoffs, right before the holiday season. Unless Mayor Bloomberg and the City Council maintain funding, libraries' ability to provide New Yorkers with job search help, afterschool tutoring, computer access and instruction, English classes, and research assistance will be sharply reduced by December 2010.

Dress in your bookish zombie best and march/shamble your way to City Hall to support your local library and feed your brain.

For more information on the Halloween Zombie Walk, please contact savenyclibraries@gmail.com

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Board of Education Candidates Forum

Thursday, October 28, Albany High School, 7-8:30 p.m.

A Board of Education Candidates Forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters and the Albany City Council PTA.

Halloween Fun and Safety

Find a collection of Halloween resources on USA.gov's newest page.

Topics include:
Candy Has a Shelf Life
Makeup Safety
Spooky Space Sounds
Halloween Folklore
And much more!

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

ACLU Report Seeks FCC Action On Internet Openness

Protecting the Internet against content discrimination by broadband carriers is crucial to protecting First Amendment rights in the age of modern technology, the American Civil Liberties Union said in a new report on network neutrality. In the report, "Net Neutrality 101," the ACLU urged the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to create strong policies that prevent Internet gatekeepers from exploiting their role for private gain. The report characterizes the need for "net neutrality" as a leading free speech issue of our time.

Monday, October 25, 2010

Get Smart About Your Finances with Free Workshops

The Main Library is hosting a series of free half-day workshops this week designed to help people with money troubles get smart about their finances. Participants can choose to attend one or more of the sessions to be held on Wednesday, Oct. 27, and Thursday, Oct. 28. All sessions are free and open to the public. Registration is required by calling the Main Library Reference Department at 427-4303.

Details HERE.

Friday, October 22, 2010

2010 SHUBERT LIBRARY EXCELLENCE AWARD WINNER ANNOUNCED

The New York State Regents Advisory Council on Libraries is pleased to announce that the 2010 Joseph F. Shubert Library Excellence Award has been awarded to the Queens Library for their entry entitled, “Queens Library for Teens”.

The Queens Library for Teens, part of Queens Library, opened in December 2008 and is located in Far Rockaway. With encouragement from the community, Queens Library pursued grants including a federally-funded Juvenile Justice Grant to support the renting of an empty storefront to house the teen library. It is two blocks away from the full-service library and is 3,500 square feet. It has unilaterally renewed library service for the community at every age level because it directs and serves teens in and out of school who had previously been disruptive in the community library. At the same time, it gives teens incentive to stay in school/get a GED and directs them into socially positive activities. The “bait” that draws teens to the space has been technology. The Queens Library for Teens has 40 customer-use computers with high-speed internet access. The teen computers can be used to do homework, access Facebook, and email. A key component is that the teens must behave in an acceptable manner in order to gain entry. Dedicated youth counselors provide service and referrals, while librarians at the full-service branch give in-depth traditional reference services. Collections, programs and facilities are geared toward the interests of teens. More than 120 teens use the center every week day.

Runner-up for this year’s Shubert Award is the Milne Library/SUNY Geneseo for their project entitled, “LILAC” (Library Instruction Leadership Academy). LILAC is a collaborative professional development project designed, organized and delivered by librarians and educators representing 8 comprehensive colleges, 4 community and/or technical colleges, 10 schools within the K-12 system and the Rochester Regional Library Council. To round out the variety of educational institutions involved in LILAC, eleven librarians were accepted into the academy with experience and background ranging from a local homeschooling initiative to an elementary school library to specialized librarians serving graduate-level programs. It was developed to be a semester-long intensive learning experience for novice instruction librarians that incorporates a variety of learning experiences including workshops, field experience, assigned readings, personal reflection, discussion, and a final culminating project. The academy was designed to provide librarians new to instruction the pedagogical training and practice necessary to effectively teach library and information literacy concepts and skills. With a $3,500 award from the Harold Hacker Advancement of Libraries Grant and $1,100 collected in participant fees, LILAC’s total budget came to $4,600. This figure, however, does not reflect the thousands of dollars contributed via in-kind and volunteer support (approximately $24,000).

The Regents Advisory Council on Libraries 2010 Shubert Award Committee (consisting of Sam Simon, Chair; Sara Kelly Johns and Louise Sherby) was enthusiastic in its decision to honor the Queens Library submission as an excellent example of “the spirit of the Shubert award”. Members from the Shubert Award Committee, along with a representative from the Friends of the New York State Library who have graciously donated the $1,000 award money, will present a plaque and the award money at the New York Library Association’s annual conference in Saratoga Springs in November. A plaque will also be presented to the runner-up, Milne Library/SUNY Geneseo
The Joseph F. Shubert Excellence Award is given annually to recognize the achievements of small, medium and large libraries and library consortia in New York State. The Award honors libraries or library consortia that have taken significant steps within the past two years to improve the quality of library service to users. For more information about the Joseph F. Shubert Library Excellence Award and the Regents Advisory Council on Libraries, visitHERE or contact the Office of the State Librarian at (518) 474-5930.

Thursday, October 21, 2010

FRIENDS PROGRAM FOR OCTOBER 26, 2010

Book Review: Storms of My Grandchildren: The Truth about the Coming Climate Catastrophe . . . by James Hansen.
Reviewers: James Collins, Ph.D., Professor of Anthropology, SUNY; Mary Ellen Mallia, Ph.D., Director of Environmental Sustainability, SUNY; & Jonathan Skinner, Ph.D., retired statistician.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Financial Literacy Training

Financial Literacy Training: Pass the Knowledge on to Your Patrons
Free workshops

Location: Albany Public Library, 161 Washington Ave, Albany NY
Dates: October 27 & 28
Times: Session 1, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Session 2, 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Presenter: Beth LeVine, Certified Financial Educator, United Way of the Greater Capital Region
Participants are asked to attend at least one full session. Lunch is included.

Wednesday, October 27, Session 1, 9:30 am -12:30 pm
• Financial responsibility: Explore your perception of money and how it affects your life. Get tips on the best ways to approach your clients/consumers about money and financial responsibility.
• Identity theft
Wednesday, October 27, Session 2, 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
• Credit: 4 types of credit, loans, credit repair
Thursday, October 28, Session 1, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
• Banking and budgeting
Thursday, October 28, Session 2, 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
• Saving, establishing an emergency fund, types of investing, home ownership, retirement

Please RSVP with name of organization, number of people participating, and which sessions you will attend, to Meg Maurer via email or phone by October 25: maurerm@albanypubliclibrary.org or 427-4328

World Statistics Day

The United Nations General Assembly designated Oct. 20, 2010, as the first-ever World Statistics Day to highlight the role of official statistics and the many achievements of national statistical systems. Statistical organizations throughout the world will celebrate World Statistics Day at the national and regional level. The census, the U.S. Census Bureau and 13 other principal federal statistical agencies together have been collecting statistics about the nation's people, economy and society since 1790.

Here are some statistics, including statistics about statistics.

Monday, October 18, 2010

Buffalo libraries, trimmed again, won't close

From the Buffalo News, Sunday, October 17:

First the good news: your local branch library won't close next year ...
The library faces a projected shortfall of $6.75 million next year. That includes a $4 million cut in the systems county funding by County Executive Chris Collins.

To close the gap, Quinn Carey said, library officials have decided not to take the painful route of five years ago when the library system shrank from 51 branches to 37 during a budget crisis... But other difficult cuts will be necessary, the director said.

Among them:
Closing to the public the second floor of the Central Library downtown where a Teen Room and business and science collections now draw patrons and consolidating all public areas of Central on the first floor.

Cutting up to 130 full-time equivalent positions, which may mean layoffs for nearly 200 employees.

Drastically trimming open hours and staff levels, as well as some programs, at city and suburban branch libraries.

Friday, October 15, 2010

FRIENDS PROGRAM FOR OCTOBER 19, 2010

Book Review: When You Reach Me, a middle-reader novel by Rebecca Stead.
Reviewer: Lyn Miller-Lachmann, author and editor.

Thursday, October 14, 2010

New York State Archives and Library announce new Saturday hours

The New York State Library and New York State Archives will institute new Saturday hours beginning on October 16th. Saturday hours of operation at the two facilities, located on the 7th and 11th floor of the Cultural Education Center (CEC) at the Empire State Plaza in Albany, will be from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free public parking will be available in the Madison Avenue parking lots adjacent to the CEC. Directions and parking information is available on the New York State Museum website.

This new policy for expanded access does not affect the hours of the New York State Museum, which is open from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day.
However if a major holiday (e.g. July 4th, Memorial Day, Veterans Day) falls directly on a Saturday, the Library and Archives will not be open (checking their websites is advised for such holidays).

The New York State Library has served New Yorkers, New York State government and researchers from throughout the United States for more than 190 years. It is the largest state library in the nation and the only state library to qualify for membership in the Association of Research Libraries. The Library's research collection of more than 20 million items includes major holdings in law, medicine, the social sciences, education, American and New York State history and culture, the pure sciences and technology.

The New York State Archives identifies, preserves, and makes available more than 200 million records of colonial and state government dating back to 1630 that have enduring value to the public and private institutions and to all the people of the Empire State and the nation.

Handbook of New York State and Local Taxes

The Handbook of New York State and Local Taxes provides a general descriptive overview of the taxes which New York State and its local governments impose, and is revised periodically to reflect recently enacted law changes. It does not include non-tax revenue sources such as motor vehicle fees and the Lottery. Instead, it focuses on taxes, especially those administered by the Department of Taxation and Finance.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

20,000 visit NYS Library exhibit at National Book Festival in DC

The New York State Library, Empire Center for the Book ,and the New York Council for the Humanities's booth at the Sept. 25 National Book Festival featured New York State’s rich literary heritage. Karen Balsen, New York State Library, Rocco Staino, Empire Book Festival, Erika Halstead, New York Council for the Humanities and volunteers stamped 10,000 US maps for children journeying through the “Pavilion of the States” exhibits; distributed New York themed tattoos and bookmarks; and provided maps and New York State literary related materials. Over 20,000 festival-goers visited the New York booth. Visitors to the New York display met Rebecca Stead, New York author and 2010 Newbery winner, who autographed copies of her award winning book, When You Reach Me.

For more information and pictures of New York State and the National Book Festival visit the New York State Library, Library Development page.

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Twitter librarians

In an attempt to help participants in a webinar about Twitter that he did last year, Bill Drew, a librarian at the Tompkins Cortland Community College (TC3) Library, created a webpage of people, libraries, and organizations that may serve as a good place to start following on Twitter. It is described as very subjective and includes people and libraries that have told him they are willing to be followed and willing to help others learn to use Twitter. The page is HERE. The website he created for the webinar is HERE. It is open for the world to use and will be subject to change as he sees fit.

Monday, October 11, 2010

Every Street, Not Wall Street Community Forum.

Thursday, October 14 · 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Location Arbor Hill / West Hill Library
148 Henry Johnson Blvd
Albany, NY

More Info Ever wish you could tell your congressman how you feel about the decisions he's making? The decisions that have such an impact on your life?

Ever wish you could tell your state senator you’re tired of living in fear of losing your job, tired of struggling to afford health care and fed up with not seeing your kids get the education they deserve?

Ever wish you could tell them you do care, you do vote and they have to listen to you?...

Well, now’s your chance. On October 14th at the new library on Henry Johnson Blvd Congressman Paul Tonko, State Senator Neil Breslin and Albany Common Council member Barbara Smith will be listening to your concerns and telling you what they are doing to make sure that Every Street Not just Wall Street sees government working for them.

RSVP HERE

Details:
What: Every Street Not Wall Street Community Forum
When: Thursday October 14, 5:30-7:30
Where: Arbor Hill / West Hill Library, 148 Henry Johnson Blvd, off street parking available
Who:
• YOU
• Congressman Paul Tonko
• State Senator Neil Breslin
• Albany Common Council, Barbara Smith

NANOvember 2010

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) cordially invites you to join the annual celebration of "NANOvember," a month-long adventure into the exciting world of nanotechnology.
Please plan to attend any of a series of events and activities - all of which are free and open to the public - that showcase nanotechnology and the global leadership of CNSE in the most important science of the 21st century.

Pre-register for CNSE NANOvember events

Help spread the word! Click here for a NANOvember flyer to pass along to your family and friends.

CNSE Community Day
Saturday, November 6, 11:00 a.m - 3:00 p.m.
CNSE invites residents of the Capital Region, Tech Valley and New York State to tour CNSE's Albany NanoTech Complex and receive an up-close look at the exciting world of nanotechnology.

CNSE Community Lecture Series

Monday, November 1, 6:30 p.m - 7:30 p.m.
CNSE Community Lecture Series presents Dr. John Elter
Explore the idea of using nature as a model in science as Dr. John Elter, Executive Director of CNSE's Center for Sustainable Ecosystem Nanotechnologies, discusses biomimicry.

Monday, November 8, 6:30 p.m - 7:30 p.m.
CNSE Community Lecture Series presents Dr. Alain E. Kaloyeros
Learn about the potential of nanotechnology, its growing impact on all facets of society, and the global leadership of CNSE and NYS with Dr. Alain E. Kaloyeros, CNSE's Senior Vice President and Chief Executive Officer.

Monday, November 15, 6:30 p.m - 7:30 p.m.
CNSE Community Lecture Series presents Dr. Matthew Hynd
Find out how innovative neuroscience research is being conducted with the use of nanotechnology at a lecture presented by CNSE Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience Dr. Matthew Hynd.

Monday, November 22, 6:30 p.m - 7:30 p.m.
CNSE Community Lecture Series presents Dr. Robert Geer
Learn how nanotechnology education is driving exciting 21st century careers with CNSE Vice President for Academic Affairs and CNSE Chief Academic Officer Dr. Robert Geer.

Nano at the Y
Saturday, November 13, 9:30 a.m - 12:00 p.m.
Experience nanotechnology, a science that is driving our technological future and the future of our region, with hands-on activities led by CNSE faculty and staff at seven of the Capital District YMCA branches.

NanoCSI
Thursday, November 18, 6:00 p.m - 7:30 p.m.
Discover how nanotechnology is being used to advance DNA testing and other technologies used in crime scene investigations at this interactive lecture with CNSE Associate Professor of Nanobioscience Dr. Scott Tenenbaum.

Nanotechnology & Video Games
Saturday, November 20, 12:00 p.m - 2:30 p.m.
Delve into the large impact of nanotechnology on the evolution of video games with interactive gaming terminals and a lecture by CNSE Associate Professor of Nanoscience Dr. Vincent LaBella.

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Awful Library Books

The best of the worst books found on public library shelves..

Librarians, bibliophiles and lovers of nostalgia are all welcome here.

This site is a collection of public library holdings that we find amusing and maybe questionable for public libraries trying to maintain a current and relevant collection. Contained in this site are actual library holdings. No libraries are specifically mentioned to protect our submitters who might disagree with a particular collection policy. (A good librarian would probably be able to track down the holding libraries without too much trouble anyway...)

L is for Libraries

"For some peo­ple it’s a church or place of wor­ship which is a refuge, a safe loca­tion to take a step out of every­day life and to breath. I’ve always headed straight for a library when I need safety and respite from the daily grind or when prob­lems need attention."

More HERE.

Small Nonprofits in Danger of Losing Tax-Exempt Status

From Guidestar:

"Time is running out for small nonprofits facing loss of tax-exempt status because they have not filed Form 990-N or Form 990-EZ for three consecutive years. The deadline for the IRS's one-time filing relief program is October 15, 2010. After that, nonprofits that (1) are required to file a 990 and (2) whose filings are at least three years in arrears will automatically lose their exemptions. To regain tax-exempt status, they will have to apply to the IRS all over again, a process that can take several months and requires payment of fees."

I went through the list and found over 200 with ZIP Codes starting with 1220.


Saturday, October 09, 2010

HRVH Historical Newspapers website launch

The Southeastern NY Library Resources Council is pleased to announce the launch of a new website, http://news.hrvh.org/ HRVH Historical Newspapers , part of the Hudson River Valley Heritage (HRVH) service. The Kingston Daily Freeman is the first newspaper to be included in this new digital newspaper repository and was completely digitized for the years 1903 to 1912. The entire contents of the newspaper issues can be searched by word and browsed by date. Complete issues of the newspaper can be viewed by full page or individual articles can be highlighted and viewed. This collection will be invaluable to historians, family researchers, teachers and students.

HRVH Historical Newspapers is the product of a two year demonstration project supported in part by Federal Library Services and Technology Act funds, awarded to the New York State Library by the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services. Using this grant and other New York State funds, SENYLRC created images and digitized 2,974 issues and 26,341 pages of The Kingston Daily Freeman from microfilm and print issues of the newspaper. The Kingston Library supplied copies of the microfilm and the City of Kingston Historian provided 106 year old print copies of the newspaper for this project.

HRVH Historical Newspapers is freely available for public use. The goal is to have the newspaper site linked from as many library websites and portals as possible so that people know that this resource is available for them to use for their research.
The vision for HRVH Historical Newspapers is to provide access to digitized copies of historical newspapers from the Hudson River Valley region of New York State. New titles added to HRVH Historical Newspapers will be based on a number of factors, such as regional significance, the availability of paper issues or master negative microfilm copies of the newspaper, and available funds.

Feel free to share this information.
***
Newspaper article about the project.

Friday, October 08, 2010

The Handbook for New Public Library Directors in New York State

Interesting item buried in my e-mails from January: the publication of The Handbook for New Public Library Directors in New York State by Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Coordinator for Library Growth & Sustainability at the Mid-Hudson Library System and current President of the NYLA Library Administration & Management Section.

"This 'New Directors’ Handbook', developed as a companion to the Handbook for Library Trustees of New York State, is an essential resource for everyone who is given the responsibility to manage a public library; or anyone who aspires to. Aimed at those just beginning in this challenging career, the Handbook focuses on the critical first steps toward success and follows through with a practical approach to continued organizational and professional growth. Though written for the newest administrator, even those with many years as a director will benefit from this fresh review of the job.

The Handbook is freely available for review and download.

FRIENDS PROGRAM FOR OCTOBER 12, 2010

Book Review: The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education by Diane Ravitch.
Reviewer: Raymond Colucciello, Ed.D., Superintendent, City School District of Albany, New York.

Thursday, October 07, 2010

Business quotes

Every month, Forbes magazine has a page of quotes at the back of the magazine - "Thoughts and Quotes on the Business of Life". Here's the link to the online database.

UAlbany's Annual Security Report

A copy of the University at Albany's Annual Security Report is now available for your information. This report, which includes campus crime statistics, is prepared in compliance with the "Jean Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act" (formerly called and more commonly known as the "Campus Security Act") and can be accessed at this web site.

This report contains recently updated information for calendar year 2009 and comprises statistics for the previous two years as well. It includes numbers for reported crimes that occur on-campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by the University at Albany; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. The report also includes institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning sexual assault and alcohol use on campus.

Wednesday, October 06, 2010

Book & Author Lunch November 13

Please mark your calendar for the Friends annual Book & Author Lunch at noon on Saturday, November 13th. We will honor writer and history professor Allen Ballard at the University Club and later at the library where he will speak.

Invitations will be sent out shortly.

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

The movie Crash - free, with discussion to follow

ALBANY FRIENDS MEETING (Quaker), 727 Madison, invites YOU to the movies with
popcorn and drinks Friday, October 8 at 6:30 pm --all FREE


Crash(2005) R
Description: Tensions erupt when the tangled lives of a Brentwood housewife, her district attorney husband, a Persian shopkeeper, two cops, a pair of carjackers and a Korean couple converge over a 36-hour period in the diverse metropolis of post-9/11 Los Angeles.

A discussion will follow the movie.

A possible outcome:
Following an honest, not complimentary talk about Quaker history around racism, at Quaker meeting in February, a spirited discussion emerged on current racism experiences and news. This 'Friendly Discussion' group comprised of European and African Americans from the Quaker Meeting and the community, began meeting monthly. The success of this experience has led to the desire to form a second group.

A second 'Friendly Discussion' group will perhaps form following this movie to
continue meeting and sharing current racism issues.

For more information, contact Barbara Spring, Racism Concerns Comm, 518-772-2290 barbarakspring4@msn.com

Monday, October 04, 2010

UAlbany Fall Festival and Book Fair Features Top Authors and Great Fun

October 9 event boasts nearly 30 UAlbany authors, a farmers' market, and student performances.

Grace White leaving town

Longtime Board member Grace White is leaving the area.

She will be missed.

Message from UAlbany President George Philip - October 1, 2010

Dear Members of the Campus Community:

This afternoon, I held a Town Hall meeting to inform the campus community of some of the difficult "next steps" the University at Albany will be taking to address its ongoing budget challenges. If you were unable to attend this meeting given the unfortunate timing, please understand that the decision to deliver this message on a Friday afternoon was not our preferred choice. It was necessary due to the limited availability of appropriate large venue options - particularly, since the Campus Center is undergoing renovation.

For those unable to join us today, I want to take this opportunity to share with you my message.

This year's State Budget reduced the level of State assistance to our campus by nearly $12 million. In fact, over the past three years, the campus has cumulatively suffered more than $33.5 million in State tax support reductions - more than a 30% decline. Since 2008, we have addressed these reductions to our revenue base through the elimination of approximately 200 vacant lines resulting from resignations and retirements, a soft-hiring freeze, reductions in non-personal expenditures and temporary service, reductions in graduate student support, a moratorium on non-essential travel, energy savings, operational efficiencies and more.

As I have said many times before, non-strategic and opportunistic short-term measures are simply not compatible with operating an organization on a sustainable basis. In the face of diminishing State support, these types of cuts are a clear pathway to mediocrity. It remains critically important for the University to rethink and rebalance its core academic and research mission given its reduced revenue base, and reallocate resources accordingly.

As late as August, we remained hopeful that passage of the Public Higher Education Empowerment and Innovation Act, including predictable and rational tuition in the future, would be adopted. If adopted as originally proposed, this landmark reform, coupled with sustained state assistance, would have helped us to address our current budgetary challenges, while at the same time, provide our campus with the tools and resources necessary to advance our academic enterprise. Regrettably, neither financial nor regulatory relief were enacted during the 2010 Legislative session.

As you may know, over the past several years, we have engaged the University community in numerous discussions about the principles that should guide budget-related decisions. I am most grateful for the perspectives and guidance provided by the Budget Advisory Groups I, II, and III, along with the University-wide strategic planning committee.

Like several other SUNY campuses, the University is now at a point where we must analyze, evaluate and consider implementing measures that reallocate resources and eliminate some existing programs. Such actions will potentially affect a number of units across the campus.

As we enter this period of further communication and dialogue, the University anticipates that the actions discussed today will unfold over a two-year period. By the end of 2012, we expect that the equivalent of another 160 full time positions will be eliminated - bringing the campus total to over 360 positions eliminated over the four-year period starting in 2008. To the extent possible, it is our sincere hope and intention to minimize the disruption across the University by achieving the majority of the reductions through attrition resulting from the early retirement incentive program, voluntary resignations and other future vacancies. Notwithstanding these efforts, by the end of this process, I regret that involuntary terminations of employment will be unavoidable.

It is important to underscore that administrative and support units have and will continue to shoulder a higher percentage of the cost savings measures adopted, which is consistent with the University's priority of protecting the academic mission. Based on what we know now, in this fiscal year and next, administrative units will absorb an additional 10% reduction in their state operating budgets, while colleges and schools will experience an additional 7% reduction. Over the four-year period ending in 2012, administrative units will have suffered a reduction in their state operating budgets of nearly 22.4%, while colleges and schools will have realized a 16.2% reduction. Of the reductions between 2008-2012, we anticipate that nearly three-quarters of the workforce actions will relate to professional and support staff, while the remaining will be faculty positions. These disproportionate reductions are consistent and in line with the values, advice and guidance I have received from the campus advisory groups previously mentioned.

In addition to job losses already incurred, our administrative and support units are being forced to implement additional budget actions that have and will continue to result in reductions in hours of service operations, diminished employee and student services university-wide, cutbacks in general operational and physical plant support, and more.

It is important to note that every possible effort is being made to ensure that the health and safety of our campus community is not compromised.

Once again, we are striving to manage future reductions in ways that will mitigate the impact on our existing employees. The University is also exploring administrative consolidations, ITS efficiencies, as well as conducting a comprehensive review of the expenditures associated with our athletics program in order to achieve additional savings.

Unfortunately, these efforts in the administrative and extra-curricular areas are by themselves not enough. The University's academic program will be further impacted. The Provost and Deans from each of the schools and colleges have been working closely over the past two years to consider and implement reduction scenarios as our fiscal challenges worsened. I am sure all of the faculty have observed and felt the impact of these changes as professional conference support has dried up, academic support services have diminished, assistantships have declined, some departments have become smaller, and class sizes have become larger. Many program changes are already underway to accommodate the current resource picture. No school or college has been exempt from these reductions, and some areas have in fact borne more of the burden only because of the opportunistic way in which the cuts had to be managed in the short term.

Going forward, Provost Phillips and I will continue to work with the Deans, Chairs, and applicable governance bodies to sustain the University's capacity to offer strong academic programs in areas of high student demand. In addition to the program changes already underway, we now must begin consideration of further actions, given the requirements of the academic calendar and the cycles associated with student and faculty recruitment.

As a first step in this more difficult phase of reallocation planning, I have issued a directive today to suspend all new admissions to five program areas - Classics, French, Italian, Russian, and Theatre. Provost Phillips and Dean Wulfert met earlier today with the faculty in each of these program areas to communicate this action and begin a discussion about the future.
This decision was based on an extensive consultative process with faculty, and in recognition that there are comparatively fewer students enrolled in these degree programs.

It is important to recognize that this action is by no means a reflection about the quality of the faculty appointed to these programs, or frankly about the value of these subjects to the liberal arts. They are and continue to be valued scholars and colleagues. The University will continue to offer a broad array of arts and humanities courses in its curriculum.

We have also taken steps in preparation for the final year of Project Renaissance - the student living learning community for first-year students. I have asked the University Senate to provide consultation to me on further action with regard to all of these program areas.

I am mindful that the identification of these specific programs makes it appear that the College of Arts and Sciences is bearing a disproportionate reduction. I want to assure you that larger reductions across the other schools and colleges are being addressed, but simply in different ways. I have asked the Provost to begin the process of initiating other program consolidations and efficiencies. While the magnitude of the reduction requires significant participation from all units, our approach will continue to be derived from the advice and guidance of each of the Budget Advisory processes: to be strategic and differentiated with a view towards the future and the goals articulated in our Strategic Plan.

In taking these actions, I also want to share with you two important principles that the University will uphold. First, the University remains fully committed to ensuring that all our students will have an opportunity to complete the specific major/program to which they have already been admitted. Equally important, the campus is committed to supporting faculty and staff impacted by resource reallocation and program decisions by providing opportunities to seek placement at another UAlbany program, to explore placement at another SUNY campus, if available, and/or to pursue retraining, where required.

As a point of clarification, I want to remind the campus community that there is a distinct difference between capital and operating funds and how they can be used. In recent months, you have noticed there is a significant level of capital construction taking place on campus. It is important to realize that State of New York prohibits SUNY campuses from using SUNY capital funding for operating related expenses, such as faculty and staff. This type of funding can ONLY be used for capital construction and improvement, as well as large equipment purchases.

Lastly, I have apprised the University Council of the campus's budget situation, and have fully reviewed with them the actions and the next steps the University intends on taking. Our Council members support us with confidence that UAlbany will continue to be nationally recognized as a center of excellence for education, research, and service.

Please be assured that I will continue to keep you informed of future developments. I also invite you to visit the Budget Update webpage on the University's MyUAlbany portal.

Once again, thank you for your dedication and support of the University at Albany.

Sincerely yours,

George M. Philip
President